Reporters Give Grisly Hint Of How The USSR Mocked The World At Mockba 1980 Olympics

Was there a grisly truth behind the smiling bear bearing flowers?

For many years, the results at the 1980 Olympic Games have been called into question because of the presence and, in the pool, domination of the GDR, but new research and witness statements, raise new questions, such as: should Denmark’s Susanne Nielsson be declared a double Olympic champion; should Britain’s Margaret Kelly be celebrated as an Olympic champion who ended her career with two golds and a silver to her name; should the first sub-15min 1500m swim be struck off the record; would Reggie de Jong, of The Netherlands be an Olympic champion and June Croft, of Britain, an Olympic silver medallist in her teens; would their coaches have been recognised in a different light? How many Aussies and other men might also be up there as Olympic champions if they had not been blocked by two and three home-crowd pleasers? The questions run because … there is a growing body of evidence that the Soviet Union ran the same kind of secret anti-antidoping program at Moscow 1980 as it did at Sochi 2014, the GDR not alone in turning to steroids and other substances to boost performances in a way that made it a sporting force beyond its true athletic capacity. Here’s some of what that would mean in the book of swimming history

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For many years, the results at the 1980 Olympic Games have been called into question because of the presence and, in the pool, domination of the GDR, but new research and witness statements, raise new questions, such as: should Denmark’s Susanne Nielsson be declared a double Olympic champion; should Britain’s Margaret Kelly be celebrated as an Olympic champion who ended her career with two golds and a silver to her name; should the first sub-15min 1500m swim be struck off the record; would Reggie de Jong, of The Netherlands be an Olympic champion and June Croft, of Britain, an Olympic silver medallist in her teens; would their coaches have been recognised in a different light? How many Aussies and other men might also be up there as Olympic champions if they had not been blocked by two and three home-crowd pleasers? The questions run because … there is a growing body of evidence that the Soviet Union ran the same kind of secret anti-antidoping program at Moscow 1980 as it did at Sochi 2014, the GDR not alone in turning to steroids and other substances to boost performances in a way that made it a sporting force beyond its true athletic capacity. Here’s some of what that would mean in the book of swimming history

Comments

Richard Ortiz

My biggest question is, was Salnikov doped????

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