Kylie Masse Into Dolphins’ Den Of Aussie Aces On A Rising Tide Of Canadian Fortunes

Kylie Masse - by Patrick B. Kraemer

Commonwealth Games, Gold Coast 2018: Kylie Masse, Taylor Ruck, not to mention Olympic champion Penny Oleksiak, are leaders in a resurgence of Canadian swimming. What a difference a Commonwealth cycle makes – at least if you’re Canadian and into swimming. By the time Glasgow 2014 was done and dusted, the once Mighty Maples – Canada the last nation to defeat Australia on the medals table, back in 1978 at home in Edmonton – were staring a stark situation in the face once more. Since then, there has been a distinct break in the clouds, some strong rays of home and even an Olympic resurgence in the pool, courtesy of a generation of young women rising to the challenge of global waters. Take this kind of evidence: Back in 2014, Canada’s women emerged from Glasgow 2014 with 13 places in the top 5 rankings across all solo events as well as two relays placed in the best 3 nations, counting GBR as one entity, not the sum of home-nation parts. Skip ahead to 2017: Canadian women had stepped up to filling 27 places in those same top 5 slots across all solo events, including three Canadians in the top 5 in four events, and were No2 to Australia in all three relays.

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Commonwealth Games, Gold Coast 2018: Kylie Masse, Taylor Ruck, not to mention Olympic champion Penny Oleksiak, are leaders in a resurgence of Canadian swimming. What a difference a Commonwealth cycle makes – at least if you’re Canadian and into swimming. By the time Glasgow 2014 was done and dusted, the once Mighty Maples – Canada the last nation to defeat Australia on the medals table, back in 1978 at home in Edmonton – were staring a stark situation in the face once more. Since then, there has been a distinct break in the clouds, some strong rays of home and even an Olympic resurgence in the pool, courtesy of a generation of young women rising to the challenge of global waters. Take this kind of evidence: Back in 2014, Canada’s women emerged from Glasgow 2014 with 13 places in the top 5 rankings across all solo events as well as two relays placed in the best 3 nations, counting GBR as one entity, not the sum of home-nation parts. Skip ahead to 2017: Canadian women had stepped up to filling 27 places in those same top 5 slots across all solo events, including three Canadians in the top 5 in four events, and were No2 to Australia in all three relays.

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