Gold In Nail-biter Relays Nail A Dolphin Dominance Dented (& Felt) By Ben Proud

Australia Day - the hosts knocked 'em all for six o celebrate a roaring victory in the pool - Commonwealth Team Australia

It was if the Dolphins needed to stamp on the toe of the man who put the only dent in Australian pride and armour in the curtain-closing session of the Gold Coast Games in then pool: seven finals, six golds, the one lost going to England’s Ben Proud, in a sizzling and 21.35 in the 50m free. Again that backdrop of Dolphin dominance, wins for Ariarne Titmus, Emily Seebohm, Mitch Larkin, Jack McLoughlin and then the women’s 4x100m medley brought home by Bronte Campbell’s rippling 51.57 roar past Taylor Ruck and Canada, we arrived at a men’s medley relay that required all three of England’s first cyclers to fire at tip-tip best to give Proud a shot at holding off Olympic 100m champion Kyle Chalmers. It almost worked – but not quite. The Dolphins got to their home end wall first, by 0.09sec. On the last of six days of Australian mauling, the rest of the Commonwealth was left in no doubt that, while they’d been welcome in the Dolphin den, the leading swim nation among nations once tied together in an empire had no intention of extending the “friendly” Games past the blocks. The meet ended with: Australia celebrating 5 more golds and 5 more medals in all than it hauled at Glasgow 2014; England maintaining No2 but falling by 3 gold and 7 medals in all compared to 2014; South Africa rising up to third on then table on the back of a doubling of gold from 3 to 6 – though with one medal less in all; Canada collecting one gold less than in Glasgow but 5 medals more in all, the silver lining and premise in clear progress this: 1 silver in 2014 – 8 in 2018; Scotland maintaining the same overall count, with 9 medals, though with 1 gold this time not the three claimed when it hosted in Glasgow. Plus: the biggest medal winners, the medals table, who’s up, who’s down, the start of our wrap of the Games

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It was if the Dolphins needed to stamp on the toe of the man who put the only dent in Australian pride and armour in the curtain-closing session of the Gold Coast Games in then pool: seven finals, six golds, the one lost going to England’s Ben Proud, in a sizzling and 21.35 in the 50m free. Again that backdrop of Dolphin dominance, wins for Ariarne Titmus, Emily Seebohm, Mitch Larkin, Jack McLoughlin and then the women’s 4x100m medley brought home by Bronte Campbell’s rippling 51.57 roar past Taylor Ruck and Canada, we arrived at a men’s medley relay that required all three of England’s first cyclers to fire at tip-tip best to give Proud a shot at holding off Olympic 100m champion Kyle Chalmers. It almost worked – but not quite. The Dolphins got to their home end wall first, by 0.09sec. On the last of six days of Australian mauling, the rest of the Commonwealth was left in no doubt that, while they’d been welcome in the Dolphin den, the leading swim nation among nations once tied together in an empire had no intention of extending the “friendly” Games past the blocks. The meet ended with: Australia celebrating 5 more golds and 5 more medals in all than it hauled at Glasgow 2014; England maintaining No2 but falling by 3 gold and 7 medals in all compared to 2014; South Africa rising up to third on then table on the back of a doubling of gold from 3 to 6 – though with one medal less in all; Canada collecting one gold less than in Glasgow but 5 medals more in all, the silver lining and premise in clear progress this: 1 silver in 2014 – 8 in 2018; Scotland maintaining the same overall count, with 9 medals, though with 1 gold this time not the three claimed when it hosted in Glasgow. Plus: the biggest medal winners, the medals table, who’s up, who’s down, the start of our wrap of the Games

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