Adlington On Finding Balance, Life After The Pool, Role Models & Cashew Nuts

Rebecca Adlington of Great Britain on her way to a second gold at Beijing 2008 - by Patrick B. Kraemer

“To live is the rarest thing in the world. Most people exist, that is all”. So said author, poet and playwright Oscar Wilde. The inference is that to exist is to survive, treading a path with tight boundaries imposed by our own and society’s expectations. It is an approach that runs counter to the world of elite sport, where such a mindset does not exist, where boundaries are there to be broken, where uncharted waters are there for the charting. And then there’s the transition from fast lane to the rest of life. Here’s Rebecca Adlington on all of that

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“To live is the rarest thing in the world. Most people exist, that is all”. So said author, poet and playwright Oscar Wilde. The inference is that to exist is to survive, treading a path with tight boundaries imposed by our own and society’s expectations. It is an approach that runs counter to the world of elite sport, where such a mindset does not exist, where boundaries are there to be broken, where uncharted waters are there for the charting. And then there’s the transition from fast lane to the rest of life. Here’s Rebecca Adlington on all of that

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