Why Hosts Russia Will Come Under Scrutiny As They Race At A Home World Titles

Yuliya Efimova, in her Trojan cap from California, looks back at her dive with Dr. Homayun Gharavi - photo by Patrick B. Kraemer

When world-championship action gets underway in the pool at the Kazan Arena tomorrow, the host nation will come under intense scrutiny for all the wrong reasons: 23 positive doping tests in aquatic sports since the capital of Tatarstan and Russia won the rights to host the showcase event six years ago; here we list the swimmers who will be racing with a positive doping test on their record

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When world-championship action gets underway in the pool at the Kazan Arena tomorrow, the host nation will come under intense scrutiny for all the wrong reasons: 23 positive doping tests in aquatic sports since the capital of Tatarstan and Russia won the rights to host the showcase event six years ago; here we list the swimmers who will be racing with a positive doping test on their record

Comments

Josh Jeffrey

Missing Aliaksandra Herasimenia of Belarus. Banned 2 years for norandrosterone in 2003. Won silver in the 2012 Olympics in the 50 and 100 free. Interestingly enough, she also has worked with Homayun Gharavi as proven in this YouTube video from 2012.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ywgY9JbLujI

Craig Lord

She’s on the list Josh, thanks. I missed her in the by country list but found her lurking in the 50 free start list …

pegasus523

Craig– forgive any naivete.

It seems that a first assault from those who believe in clean sport must come in support for stronger penalties against prohibited substances and methods. Kirsty Conventry has publicly supported lifetime bans while acknowledging that will take time. With emerging evidence that prohibited substances give lifetime advantages the argument for lifetime bans becomes stronger.

Dianabol, turanibol, stanzalol– crude methods should be dealt with harshly. Remove the athletes, coaches, doctors– past and present. Vigilantia pro pacem.

Craig Lord

Not naive from where I stand, Pegasus. I agree. For such serious substances, there should be lifetime bans. Full stop. By 2020, such things will be based on criminal law, not just sports law, in some countries (that is already the case for minors in some countries).

Ger

I know it’s a different sport, but news has just emerged that over 80% of Russian athletes (IAAF) who have won medals, showed suspicious test results. This just indicates the culture of doping that exists in that country.

Yozhik

The dogs bark, but the caravan goes on.
Ger, I wish it would be only Russia where all doping happens. Then there will be no problem to locate it and stop it from spreading. If to believe WADA boss then Craig’s list has to be 10 times wider. Your news and Eugene’s like statistics prove only that this beast are getting stronger and stronger. While sport as entertainment is profitable it will require heroes and winners to exist. If one is not naturally gifted to the level that puts him out of the reach in competition then there would be a demand on pharmaceutical help. If you make the punishment harsher it will only increase the price of awards, briberies and corruption to compensate the risk. If you ban all cyclist dopers then there would be no Tour de France. So whoever runs this business balances there approach to the problem. It is not my view it is a law of economics. Don’t you know the story of Prohibition or War on Drugs? But there are also a good examples as well. It is amazing of how significantly decreased the number of male smokers in US. Such effect was achieved without making a smoking a criminal act. Also if it is the fact that professional highly profitable sports in USA like football, basketball and ice hockey are relatively clean then there is something that can be learned from by swimming community.

Eugene

Only one major doping case for the US since 2008! Do you believe that Americans are 20 times less doped than Russians or Chinese? I don’t.

Anyway there’s too much talking about doping and it always brings holywars and negativity. Let’s focus on swimming. Does anybody know where to watch Championships online with decent video quality? I don’t have TV 🙂

Ger

What country are you in Eugene?

aswimfan

In that photo on the starting block with Homayun Gharavi video recording, Efimova shows incredible physique that would make even Hosszu green with envy.

aswimfan

Eugene, if you invest in a VPN connection, you will be able to watch any program anywhere in the world. I am watching FINA worlds from eurosport UK even though I am located in Indonesia.

aswimfan

The next explosive crisis:

Leaked IAAF doping files reveal ‘extraordinary extent of cheating’

Athletics is facing a new crisis after fresh allegations of suspected doping emerged following a leak of test data.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/0/athletics/33749208

Is it only a matter of time before same thing happens to swimming?

aswimfan

“Russia emerges as “the blood testing epicentre of the world” with more than 80% of the country’s medals won by suspicious athletes, while Kenya had 18 medals won by suspicious athletes.”

Russia’s tainted sporting medals will be boosted even more when Kazan concludes (I’m looking at you, Efimova, Ustinova, and the other Russian swimmers whom I am suspecting)

Zhen Sun

Great comment Yozhik. Apparently you are among the few here who actually understand Econ 1.

peter robinson

Doping doesn’t occur in US swimming, because it comes largely from an upper middle class background. But their track and field team is doped to its eyeballs.

Craig Lord

Yozhik, cultural approaches and education are important. You also need to remove people, too. I think swimming is also relatively clean and in many programs very clean. There are whole teams of clean athletes in Kazan. I speak for them, not those who condone and excuse all the time by saying ‘murder, theft, bullying and all in between happens so let’s just accept it, turn a blind eye etc…’. I fundamentally disagree with the approach of people like Eugene.

Craig Lord

There’s not too much talk about doping – we focus on swimming all the time here, Eugene, but to ignore the doping curse is not what clean athletes and their programs want: for every open comment like yours I get 100 and more emails from athletes and coaches and parents and others saying ‘please keep the pressure on’. Your assumption that the numbers in Russia and the numbers of say the Chinese in the 1990s must mean everyone else is doing the same is wholly wrong.

Craig Lord

That’s part of that ARD investigation, aswimfan, the link in the copy (well worth watching, or listening to when the video says sorry this part blanked out because of image rights)

Craig Lord

Don’t be silly Zhen Sun 🙂 … we all understand – we just disagree on how to spread good culture to bad and not have it go the other way round.

pegasus523

Doping is a serious crime against Sport and all participants, even those at the novice level. It is important for all of us to work hard to keep it clean. Elite athletes worldwide, those most directly under DC rules, want a clean field of play. They look to the media, sport leaders and genuine public interest to work on their behalf. Clean sport is therefor, a public trust responsibility.

on another note– Craig, with DC case results no longer posted on the FINA website, where is the repository?

Craig Lord

Pegasus – I have the entire list and will make it a part of our archive when time allows me later in the year to format the file in a semblance of order, so to speak. FINA will keep the full lists, we assume, for its records but will no longer make that information public.
The rest of your comment: spot on.

Tom Tobar

@peter robinson August 2, 2015

“Doping doesn’t occur in US swimming, because it comes largely from an upper middle class background. But their track and field team is doped to its eyeballs.”

I can’t tell if you’re joking or not.

The US Postal cycling Team (part of the US cycling program) of the late 1990s early 2000 led by L. Armstrong (who was only one of the many US cyclist busted) was doped to the gills.

“In October 2012 USADA released a report saying that the team had run “the most sophisticated, professionalised and successful doping programme the sport has ever seen”

Most of them came from wealthy background.

beachmouse

Not so much doping in swimming in the USA because it’s just not financially worth the risk. Get past the Phelps/Lochte/Coughlin/Franklin top tier, and while it’s easier to make a middle class wage as an elite swimmer in some ways than in athletics (USAS is a lot better about fully funding National Team members than USAT is) the A- level of track athletes can do a lot better financially-shoe contracts are a lot bigger than swim apparel contracts and there is nothing in swimming that comes close to what you can make in appearance fees on the Diamond League circuit.

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