WADA Slaps China IOC-Laboratory With Four-Month Ban & Told: Shape Up On 5 Levels

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The World Anti-Doping Association has suspended the accreditation of the IOC-recognised laboratory in Beijing, China, for four months. The move comes less than a week after WADA revoked, once more, the accreditation of the Moscow laboratory in Russia, and suspended the unit in Lisbon, Portugal

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Comments

beachmouse

Too bad this didn’t come down before Chinese swim nationals.

ronaham

Chinese swimmers are in the Olympic Games or world championships have received WADA test, do not know which swimmers were found to be positive?

Craig Lord

ronaham, the question isn’t clear. If you are asking which swimmers tested positive in competition, few do. It is the out-of-competition test which is often the most significant. And on that score, China has the worst record in world swimming, clearly.

ronaham

Claig,I know, in the 90 s, the Chinese swimming is notorious. But in the past decade, Chinese swimming is no different with other countries, China does not appear in the world series is positive, the domestic detection and few EPO and synthetic steroids these bad examples

Craig Lord

Chinese swimming is indeed different to other countries, ronaham. There have been double-digit figures of positives among Chinese swimmers since the crisis years, many of them very young and in the control of rogues who are abusing them and care even less about sport, fair play and respect for international competition and competitors. It simply is not true to say ‘no different’. Britain, Germany, Sweden, Spain, many other nations: zero positives in the same time frame (and no, they are not all cheating but getting away with it, as some argue). The latest cases in China, six positives, 2 known about and at review, 4 not yet fully declared, should have been dealt with by now. FINA director called them “a small number of cases”. If in GBR, USA, AUS etc there were 6 cases at once it would be anything but small – indeed, it would be huge. Beyond that, ridiculous for China to think it could keep the Sun Yang case a secret and impose no penalty on him – that should never have happened. There is a lot China can still improve – and that won’t happen if people keep saying and possibly even believing ‘no different’… yes, there is a difference. I would imagine there are a lot of coaches and kids and programs working clean in China – I feel for them. They need a more robust approach from those in charge of swimming and sport and anti-doping in China. Right now, they are being badly let down.

beachmouse

While the Americans are hardly perfect in terms of doping history, they are wonderfully transparent these days about their anti-doping process. Go to the USADA web site, and they’ve got searchable records of athletes tested across all their sports since 2001. (That database has become quite helpful to sports journalists trying figure out that Anthony Ervin and Michael Phelps had were getting drug tested again and were considering comebacks or that Dana Vollmer never officially retired at all.)

I can’t see China providing that kind of information publicly any time soon.

Craig Lord

Nor FINA, beachmouse – nor is USA Swimming pressing FINA to change that, as far as I can see: all previous case histories have been removed from the public domain. There is no resource for the journalist now as far as FINA is concerned. It cares only to ease the load of those who tested positive, served their time and are now back in the water and would rather not have the world reminded of what they did. FINA is assisting that process and working against the interests of clean athletes in that regard, in my view. “Zero-tolerance” it is not.

ronaham

You are right, China’s swimming positive information are opaque, but that is because China is an authoritarian state, information opaque is their trick, not only in the sports field. So we can’t so without doubt the Chinese swimmer is not clean.
Even if the information is transparent and open, but the United States remains the world of the countries most affected by abuse of stimulant, Lance Armstrong, Carl Lewis, Marion Jones exposure before the star also is very transparent, some American star is now so transparent, but may also be the next Armstrong.
I want to say is that although China’s swimming is not open and the infamous, the United States sports is transparent and stimulant abuse,But we shouldn’t have a prejudice against them before their athletes are proved to be no clean.

Craig Lord

ronaham – you are mixing issue and sports. USA track and field has long proven itself to be a place of problems, with sponsors backing problems and much else. There is NO evidence of any such thing in swimming; there is a great deal of evidence to suggest a good culture is at play, by and large. Armstrong is a good example: when the truth came out, he was barred from returning to the swimming program where he had been working. He pleaded his case etc, but he did not get to get back in the water. No meant no. That doesn’t always happen in places far and wide around the world, as we know. China says it has dealt with its past and yet, Zhou Ming continues to work with children and young athletes, even though he was one of the architects of the dreadful abuse of the 1990s. He was banned for life (I was at the press conference when that was announced) yet at some stage that was reduced to 8 years; he was seen on a poolside within 7 years of his ban – no reply to my questions from CSA; he is still working with kids, some elite. If China wants to show it is serious, there;s a starting point. If it turns out that ZM has worked in any capacity with any of the 6 latest cases of doping in China he ought to be banned for life (again) and removed from all possibility of working with children. If China is serious, then it needs to insist on things such as autopsy when a national youth champion of 17 dies in the early hours of the morning on an official training camp in Beijing. It is impossible to think that a child like that could be cremated within 36 hours of a sudden death at an official training camp in GBR, USA, AUS, GER and many many other countries without the authorities stepping in and saying ‘halt – there must be an autopsy’, regardless of whatever anyone else says. It is a matter of law (and I believe there is that provision in China, too – China being a country where autopsy became a national decree a great many centuries ago (fascinating history on that, among many fascinating aspects of Chinese history and culture through the ages, many a pioneering moment in the mix).

Zhen Sun

In fact CHINADA has some published information regarding the total number of tests conducted in each sport and the information on positive tests.

For example, you can find here that in Oct-Dec of 2015, CHINADA conducted 389 urine and 97 blood tests in swimming, roughly half of them out of competition tests: http://www.chinada.cn/xfjjcjg/2038.jhtml

I am not sure how that number compares to other countries.

Also you can find all the positive tests results in 2015 here:
http://www.chinada.cn/wgcfjg/index.jhtml

Notably, there were quite a few clenbuterol cases last year. All were all only given a warning, while other S1 category violations were dealt with the 4-year ban.

Craig Lord

Thanks Zhen, the clenbuterol warnings are simply not good enough: it cannot be that a banned substance is more tolerated in one place in the world than another because of the possibility (and only that) that meat contamination is a greater risk. On that basis, the USA should have tons of exemptions because cough medicines and headache pills and all manner of things, some easily bought over the counter, come in doses far higher than you can buy in Europe even on prescription. One rule for all is what it should be. Ning got a year – and that is what the others should get, too: it is softness, and systematic softness at that, to hand down any other penalty in those cases.

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