WADA Doping Report: ‘Ban Russia’; Shadow Lab Uncovered; Sports Minister Implicated; Interpol Launches Global Inquiry; Suspensions Galore

The World Anti-Doping Authority (WADA) has called for Russia to be banned from the IAAF and international track and field events in in the interim report into allegations of systematic doping, the covering up of positive doping tests and the corruption and fraud inherent in those claims. Further, the Investigation Committee (IC) recommends that Moscow’s IOC-anti-doping testing laboratory be stripped of its accreditation; shoal of provisional suspensions imposed on athletes, coaches and a doctor; criminal allegations file handed to Interpol

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The World Anti-Doping Authority (WADA) has called for Russia to be banned from the IAAF and international track and field events in in the interim report into allegations of systematic doping, the covering up of positive doping tests and the corruption and fraud inherent in those claims. Further, the Investigation Committee (IC) recommends that Moscow’s IOC-anti-doping testing laboratory be stripped of its accreditation; shoal of provisional suspensions imposed on athletes, coaches and a doctor; criminal allegations file handed to Interpol

Comments

ThereaLuigi

What a bomb they dropped!

aswimfan

Interestingly, after the bomb dropped earlier in the year by the German tv ZDF and having several of their little fish caught positive for doping, Russia’s medals won in Kazan were far fewer than previously predicted.

Not unlike China in 1998 Perth or China in 1994 Hiroshima.

Ironically (and tragically for swimfans everywhere), their highest profile swimmer to have been banned, Efimova, actually lessened the embarrassment.

beachmouse

Everyone’s digging into the meat of the report right now and the Telegraph quotes that:

“documented cases where athletes who did not want to participate in ‘the programme’ were informed they would not be considered as part of the federation’s national team for competition”.

Yozhik

The dropped bomb will be carefully intercepted and will never explode. There would be no new version of Olympic boycott because it is too damaging for the business called international sport as we have it now. There would be some scapegoats found by Interpol and there would be some replacements at the intermediate official level. And that would be it. As to Russian people this news won’t be wide spread and the coaching mentality won’t change over night. Should it be any sanctions they will shown by propaganda as one more example of hostile attitude toward Russia. BTW don’t you know that recent airplane bombing was orchestrated by CIA and executed by Ukrainian fascists? If you don’t then read articles from the major Russian News agencies.

Craig Lord

Not this time, Yozhik… expect consequence.

Yozhik

“Who is naive, Kate?” Godfather
Let’s see.

Craig Lord

One could say ‘those who believe in miracles’, which includes you, Yozhik, by your own word. That would be harsh on angels and other celestials. Let’s see indeed. My take: there will be consequence – and all the more so when official organisations, working with police authorities with the permission of government agencies and even governments themselves stand up and say ‘FIFA, you’re like the mafia and we’re going to take you out like we did them’ (as Andrew Jennings put it in the Senate hearing on FIFA – ‘you don’t go and ask ‘Sorry, Mr. Gotti, sir, would you mind making sure there’s a little less heroine on the streets…’ … you take him out, no Requiem mass, so to speak; ‘Russian athletics, IAAF bigwigs, you brought the sport you are guardians of into disrepute – you must go’ – and that applies to others sports and feds, too; it is a matter of time. Bad things will remain in the world, the light and dark of it a part of the things that bind us to humanity but history is stacked high with cultural, social, legal change that led to better moments and ways of being. Sport has reached a tipping point through greed, arrogance and a belief by those running the show that they are untouchable. They are not.

longstroke

One of the lessons here is that we cannot rely on each country to test its own athletes. We would all have much more confidence in the integrity of the system if WADA conducted the testing. However, to do it on a global scale would be enormously expensive. Perhaps there could be a dual approach where each country’s anti-doping agency carried out tests with WADA also doing some random testing. If WADA’s own tests revealed that a particular country’s athletes over a given period of time had exceeded the threshold number of doping violations then that country’s right to perform tests and declare its athletes clean would be taken away. In that situation WADA would then step up the testing of the athletes from the offending nation and pass on the extra costs to that nation’s relevant sporting bodies.

Hetty Oliver

All Russian athletes regardless of their code should be banned from competing at the 2016 Olympics. Unfortunate for those “not involved in doping”. Can we link Putin to this directly? Wasn’t the Government feeding the dope to some of the athletes/swimmers?

Craig Lord

If the ARD document bearing Putin’s name is authentic – and there is no reason to believe it is not – then, yes, we can link Putin directly to the mess, Hetty; and given that it is Putin’s sports minister who is up to his neck in it all, it would be highly naive to think that the boss didn’t know anything about what was going on, it seems to me.

Craig Lord

That sounds like a fair model, longstroke. On costs, there would be no issue for most major players if the WADA Code obliged nations who wish to take part in the Olympic Games etc etc to make a contribution to the bill that comes with testing their athletes. The details would need some negotiation, of course but the more successful nations up the top of the medals table would contribute more … I will have more to say on that theme soon…

commonwombat

No, Hetty, there would appear to be some degree of difference to the “old days” where the sports doping in Eastern Bloc nations was fully “state-supported” in that the programs were fully funded and run by the state. Sports in today’s Russia are NOT run along the old centralised Soviet models and funding may come from private sector sources.

Here, the lines look distinctly blurred and perhaps Mr Pound may have described it more accurately as “state sanctioned” where the “state” is not necessarily running or funding the doping programs but more tacitly encouraging these activities and “running interference” by seeking to cover up infractions/obstruct external investigations.

This most certainly is a “bomb”; maybe not Hiroshima sized but perhaps along the lines of a Dresden fire-bombing. How this will all play out; I would not hazard a guess but I doubt it will just stop with athletics

Craig Lord

Commonwombat; I believe the links to be stronger than you suggest. There is not much of the blurred in a government decree to all border officials in a country signed by Putin that calls on them to stop all anti-doping samples at the border for checking before they leave. Some difference there will always be but that is precisely the kind of control inherent in State Plan 14:25. You can see the involvement of the sports minister – I can’t imagine that he acted without reference to other political figures on his list of contacts, including those who sat around a table and agreed that it would be wise to order the halting of samples at the border…

ThereaLuigi

Yozhik, those words were Mike’s, not the Godfather’s … get your quotes right 😉

And no, there are going to be consequences. This thing is just too big to be swept under the rug.

aswimfan

I fear for the safety of Mr. Pound now. WADA and IOC need to hire bodyguards and food tester for him.

commonwombat

Craig, by no means am I disagreeing with you with regards to the apparent complicity.

My point was putting this in historical context with regards to Hetty’s question/assertion. The fact is that sports in Russia are no longer run along the old centralised “state run” lines. The evidence has been seen with the gradual decline of Russia in various sports where they had been previously dominant.

The financing is no longer from the state but often from various oligarchs who run/control various industrial/commercial interests; some of whom are most definitely questionable. Do some of them have links to Putin ? Evidence suggests YES.

Where I will differ from you, at this point, is that I’m reluctant to draw an automatic parallel to State Plan 14.25. Realistically, the only nation where this would now be a realistic proposition is North Korea however where would the money come from ? Even inside Russian national teams, there are different training squads with some showing clear evidence of being “dirty”, others much cleaner.

Has the Russian government been, at best, tacitly approving doping ? It certainly appears that way. Are they complicit in the cover-up of these activities and the obstruction of independent investigation ? There would appear to strong evidence of this being so.

Are they the one’s operating/financing these programs ? As yet, unproven. Just what is their role, if any, in the facilitation of these programs ? As yet to be established. Until these can be established, it may be unwise to automatically draw a parallel to the old East German regime.

Let’s deal with the facts of the case(s) in front of us as they come to hand rather than make historical comparisons to regimes that realistically CANNOT exist in today’s world.

Craig Lord

I take your points Commonwombat and agree with much, if not all of it. Where I would depart from that is State Plan 14:25 – we are not talking about a match and as you suggest the same circumstances are highly unlikely to unfold today BUT men in uniforms and suits sitting around a table, be those at Moscow regional level – with the presence of some from national-level politics, a strong thread between those worlds in the mix – or at national government level from whence the decree in question came – and thos men making decisions that directly affect the lives and health and well-being of young athletes is definitive state/political interference and influence on sporting regimes, culture and outcomes. What Hetty wrote was:Can we link Putin to this directly? Wasn’t the Government feeding the dope to some of the athletes/swimmers?
My answers: Yes, we can … and No, but no more than Honecker did in the GDR days even though his thumbprint was on the decree, so to speak – guilty as hell, in my view. We can’t know what Putin’s stand on this is beyond the words he speaks. We do know he was based a few miles from Kreischa as a Russian official for several years during the days of the GDR State Plan 14:25, so he may well have been interested to learn what was going on on his doorstep back then, assuming, like the rest of us, he didn’t know the details of it all at the time.

Yozhik

🙂 Luigi, the godfather in my quote was the name of the movie that is 43 year old. I was not sure that young people know who Michael Carleone is and they will recognise the quote and purpose of it as people of our generation do. Mentioning the name of the movie as the source was safer.
Also I didn’t say that there wouldn’t be any consequences. The question is what will be the magnitude of them. So far National swimming federations are caucious with the level of criticizm in their statements. With the exception of Australia. Russia is in denial. The problem is as this report says that this disease is wide spread. As you know the frequent outcome of serious surgery on particular part of the body of deeply sick patient is the death. There will be plenty of proponents advocating for the therapeutic approach to the problem.

commonwombat

Craig, by no means am I seeking to absolve Putin, Mutko, Rodchenko or any others along the line. This is big and the fall-out ….. as yet we don’t know how far or wide “the fertilizer” will fall.

Sadly, its hard not to take a view that the IOC & the various sporting hierarchies operate wherever possible in states of inertia’ if not by will but by strong suspicions of mutual blackmail. Ie, don’t act against me because I’ve got %@#& on you and your organisation and if I go down; so do you and YOUR organisation. Cynical perhaps but such is politics.

As I may’ve stated earlier, it’s hard to be somewhat cynical when it comes to Richard Pound. A good if not outstanding sprint freestyler of the early 60’s; he was as obsequious a courtier of the Samaranch regime at the IOC and its not too long a stretch to suggest that “pique” and “wounded amour proper” at failing to succeed Samaranch may be key motivating factors behind his late life conversion into fearless anti-doping/corruption campaigner. He sure as hell never rocked the boat before !

With regards to the world-wide picture in swimming and other Olympic sports, I DO think its doubtful that we still have the state-run doping programs of the Cold War era. What we most likely have are “rogue squads” which could be found ANYWHERE including those nations that make the biggest anti-doping noises; not just the “usual suspects”.

The question is just where do the various connections lead ? Just what is the level of complicity of not just national anti-doping bodies but the national federations ? Are there links to government(s) and the scope of such links ? What did the international sporting body know ? Their reasons for (in)action ?

beachmouse

I do think that if Russian athletics had essentially kept the doping internal, they could have more or less escaped the worst sanction by claiming they had replaced certain personnel in their federation. It’s the outright bribery to IAAF that takes it to a new level and will be hard to ignore. Pending French police investigation, part 2 of the report is what’s going to have to force extreme action against Russian athletics.

Craig Lord

Commonwombat, we are starting to see answers to some of those latter questions:
– rogue programs backed by politicians all the way to the top of a regime
– federations handing out awards to those at the helm of regimes without a clue as to what’s going on; blinded by money and power they walk into disasters of their own making
– federations in track and field, at domestic and international level that are now cited by WADA’s IC – beyond the media – as having not only been complicit but directly involved in systematic doping – the latter a term specifically stated in the report
– the IAAF as an entity we cannot yet say – but the president (ex) and the head anti-doping officer stand accused of not only complicity but direct involvement in the doping of athletes, according to police authorities per suing those cases

Yes, more to be revealed but the link between all the organisations and entities you mention has been established .. and that adds up to ‘systematic’ – and the report states the pane;’s belief that it is ‘not only Russia’ and ‘not only athletics’.

Yozhik

Luigi, you are the only person so far among those who are posting to this thread who put a “smiling face” icon in your comment. So I am cowardly addressing to you to avoid angry crushing response from the editor 🙂
I’ve been on both sides of “iron curtain” and from my experience and only from it I am concluding that there is no such thing like “iron curtain” in minds of those who runs big business regardless their nationality. Same species – two legs, two hands, one head, …., same temptations, same sins. I’ve never seen prosecutor prosecuting himself. I don’t know who run this show now and that is where my scepticism is coming from. I will never believe that FINA’s goverment will do something significant in response to current investigation. It is not in their interest as well as it is not in any interest of those who elected them.
Whenever it will come to the sanctions you wil seel same kind of arguments as we usually see at any forums whenever it comes to the doping violations among athletes of particular nation. That is “LOOK WHO IS TALKING…” . It is an endless dispute where no reasoning can prevail. Since a lot of politics and financial consequences will be involved I’m inclining to think that it won’t be that dramatic as many people here are expecting it to be. It won’t be even of the same level as FIFA scandal. But I’m not an oracle and will be glad to be wrong with my predictions.

ThereaLuigi

Dear Yozhik, what you write about corruption being one and the same across the world is true, even obvious to thinking adults. Yet I do sense – and this is just my opinion – that there will be serious, not just symbolic, consequences. I don’t think they would have exposed themselves with these serious accusations if they did not want to pursue. Then again I am not more informed than anyone else and this is just my opinion. We will see.

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