Taylor’s Little Sister Kaylee McKeown Sets 2:10 14-Year Aussie Age 200 Back Mark

Photo, courtesy of Swimming Australia
Photo, courtesy of Swimming Australia

Next generation swimming sensation Kaylee McKeown set the pool alight on the second night of finals at the 2016 Georgina Hope Foundation Australian Age Championships at the SA Aquatic & Leisure Centre in Adelaide, writes Kathleen Rayment for Swimming Australia.

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aswimfan

Impressive swim by Kaylee McKeown.
Seems to become the next Aussie female superstar swimmer.

aswimfan

2:10 for 14 yo sounds very fast, but 28 years ago, a 14 yo Egerszegi swam 2:09 without swimming cap, old school swimsuit, and open turn.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_dTdyWUbQVw

Yozhik

@asf: great race of one of the greatest swimmer. It looks like she retired too early, but it was almost ten years intensive sport career. At what age did Egerszegi peak?

gheko

Egerszegi was an exceptional talent, Kaylee is just emerging at 14, maybe she will go on to bigger and better things, maybe not, Yolane Kukla was also going to be the next Jodie Henry at 14!

Brad

Kuklas’ story is a sad one. Followed her coach Palfrey to WA only to be dumped in favour of another teenager Cook.

Begs the question – Are these barely teenage female swimmers being thrashed in training only to be burnt out when they should be peaking? Not much longevity in that approach. Will be interesting to see what Cook does at Aus Trials.

paolo rubbiani

Good 49.59 lead-off by Jack Cartwright (17, very promising sprinter in my opinion) and good second leg (49.01) by Clyde Lewis (18) for St. Peters Western (winner of the 400 free relay with a new age group record).
Always in the 100 free, solid 50.81 to win the individual race from 15 year-old Elija Winnington.
Glimpses of hope about the future of Aussie sprinting (obviously there is also Chalmers very young)) also for Commonwombat?

paolo rubbiani

Ah, also 18 year-old Kersten under 50″ with his 49.96 lead-off.

Felix Sanchez

Funny to see aswimfan’s comment because that was the first thing that popped into my head. As stated, a great time for a 14y.o. But also a reminder of a unique talent in our sport.

Brad,

What is Kukla’s situation, do you know? She’s was certainly incredibly muscular for her age, which may suggest excessive training and too much early strength work. I’d basically forgotten her name until these comments. (And please don’t be offended, but could I recommend not saying ‘begs the question’ if you mean ‘raises the question’. Pet hate, but sadly a losing battle.)

gheko

I think Yolane was a gymnast before taking up swimming, which made her very explosive over 50m.

aswimfan

Yes, Kukla was a gymnast before training as a swimmer, which means she already developed her muscles at a very young age and her power to weigh ratio was off the chart for a swimmer.

commonwombat

Kukla WAS a converted gymnast which gifted her early muscle development and explosiveness, especially off the blocks. The flip-side was this led her to “spin her wheels”/develop an exceptionally high stroke-rate that proved inefficient. She used to “die” terribly in 100s of free & fly and the return of C1 & emergence of C2 has seen her superceded in 50free.

Cartwright was at World Juniors last year (anchor leg of the winning 4×100). Like any age-grouper; the question of whether he’ll transition to top-line senior cannot be known. At this point, he’s a 49man; good enough for semis at Trials maybe even sneaking into the final.

However, AUS has a whole ruck of 49men/49splitters of all ages be they age -groupers; age stars who haven’t made it as seniors and mature age swimmers who’ve never quite made it. None of these, at this point, scream out “I’m what’s missing in the 4×100” !

Yozhik

Yolane Kukla is too heavy to be a gymnast (134 lb) and to short to be elite swimmer (5ft 6in). Yes Dawn Fraser was successful having similar form (148 lb, 5ft 8in), but when was it ? Oh, 50 years ago. A lot of things have changed since then in competitive swimming.

gheko

She has Olympic gold from relay in London 2012 (heat swim) plus Commonwealth 50m free gold in 2010, plus 2 relay pan pac silvers, so she has done good just not as good as was expected, she is still only 20yrs old!

Yozhik

Sure, things happen, but I think that times of “The little Mouse” – Egerszegi or Evans is a long history. Contemporary swimming is pushing swimmers to the limits. Therefore each swimming discipline dictates particular forms and physical abilities. In case of Kukla it’d better to operate with her times rather than with medals she won. It will give better understanding of where she is and what she is capable of.

aswimfan

Lisbeth Trickett, 5’6″, 130 lb, won 7 Olympics medals (including 4 golds), 16 World LCM Championships (including 8 golds), broke multiple WRs in 4 individual events.

So I guess Tricketts shouldn’t have become a sprinter or a swimmer?

aswimfan

By the way, Trickett swam “contemporary swimming”, whatever that is defined by Yozhik.

aswimfan

That 14 yo Kriztina little mouse Egerszegi swam 2:09.
That may sound irrelevant to today’s “contemporary swimming”.

But give that 14 yo Egerszegi swimming cap, put her in today’s high tech swimsuit, give her today’s modern backstroke starting block and allow her do flip turn instead of open turn, and she’d swim a 2:06.
at 14 yo.

BoetMate

Aswimfan you beat me to it but I will post anyway.

Mmm Libby Trickett, not a bad swimmer but at 5ft 6in clearly too short. But hey she only broke the world record in the 50 and 100 free and her 52.62 100 free PB would probably still final/medal at the Rio Olympics.

Image if someone had told her when she was a developing young swimmer that she was too short to be competitive at an elite level and she believed it.

I do acknowledge that many sprinters are taller than average but stature or lack of it is no impediment to performance: talent+skill+determination+hard work.

PS don’t comment on Kenneth To, a young Aussie (5ft 7in), who before injury and in 2013 swam a 48.58 for the 100 free. I believe, after a back op he is fit and firing so I look forward to another “shorty” leaping out from the normal height distribution curve at trials in April.

aswimfan

Yes Boetmate,

I actually agree that height/being tall is an advantage for a swimmer.

And I disagree with Yozhik’s way of dismissing legendary swimmers’ past achievements as if they would not have mattered at all in today’s “contemporary swimming”.

BoetMate

ASF, I was directing my previous post at Yozhik. Anyway here is an interesting fact. The 4 X 200 free relay world record was broken at the 2008 Olympics by an Aussie team with an average height of 1.70m (5ft 7 in) Rice/Barratt/Palmer/Mckensie.

On that occasion the USA team of Schmitt/Coughlin/Burckle/Hoff were beaten by 2 seconds into third place averaged 1.77 (5ft 9.5 in). Another win for the shorties.

Sure on “average” elite swimmers are taller but there are too many great short swimmers out there to be a real impediment to success.

What about Kosuke Hagino of Japan who is arguably one of the top male swimmer in the world. Kosuke is 5ft 8.75 in tall.

gheko

Yolane’s best times from 2010 as a 15yr old are 24.74 and 54.02

aswimfan

Actually, those 24.74 and 54.02 were swum when Kukla was 14 yo. 24.74 in Jr Pan Pacs in Maui, 2010 and 54.02 in Irvine Grand Prix, 2010.

Yozhik

Ok, asf let’s see who will win golds in Rio – athletes who feats profile or those who are exception.
In my time when a child wanted to be trained at sport club this child was required to come to coach with both parents. It wasn’t because a coach liked to kill paid time chatting with adults, he was checking the genetics. I think not much has changed since then. I don’t understand what you are arguing against. If now swimmers are swimming in caps with gugles in perfect suits with perfectly designed technic the advantage in physical forms becomes the decisive factor. Sure among 100 cases that prove this fact there can be one when a swimmer has some abnormally developed feature that compensates the deficiency in other physical abilities (like power that comes with size).
Whenever I am watching Janet Evans’ races I have an impression that I watching someone who was never trained to swim and has no idea what a swimming technic is. And then I am reading that she apparently had inexhaustible cardio-respiratory reserves.
Yes, such exceptionally exceptional feature can happen. Does it prove that the general rule is incorrect. No, it doesn’t. If you disagree you will never get a coaching recruiting job 🙂

aswimfan

Yozhik,

Did you actually read my comments or not?

Please read them again.

aswimfan

Yozhik,

Here’s the summary of what I wrote just several comments above:

Yes Boetmate,

I actually agree that height/being tall is an advantage for a swimmer.

And I disagree with Yozhik’s way of dismissing legendary swimmers’ past achievements as if they would not have mattered at all in today’s “contemporary swimming”.

Yozhik

BoetMate it is a very interesting statistics when shorties win. It deserves to be studied. Especially if is a relay. There is a very old joke when a doctor in hospital reports that the average temperature of his patients is normal. Some of them are dead cold and others have a fever. Maybe the weakest American swimmer was short and strongest Australian one was tall. I also will expect more exceptions from the general rule on women side rather them on men side where competition is more developed.

BoetMate

Yozhik I agree with you about averages, they mean very little. As a variation on your doctor analogy- if your head is in the oven and you butt is in the freezer, on average you are feeling OK 
Countries that allow kids to participate in sports that they are passionate about irrespective of whether their physical attributes match the norm or preferred profile for each particular sport have always been the most successful. Why? Because passion and enjoyment of sport (that is why we do sport) will always result in the most successful athletes.

The few countries that have tried and still do to recruit/force kids into targeted sports on the basis of physical attribute s (or attributes of their parents) have had limited sustained success which has been difficult to measure anyway as they have often gone down route of illegal chemical enhancement as well.

I live in Australia and kids are encouraged to participate in any sport of their choosing and as a country of 22M people, we punch well above our weight in world sport.

Sure, swimming coaches get excited when a 6 ft2, 13 year old pitches up for training with a 6ft6 father but often the drive and passion aren’t there and they fall by the wayside anyway.

But yes, I agree elite swimmers are generally taller than the general population pool they come from but there are enough shorter elite swimmers that we simply shouldn’t label some promising swimmer as too short.

In the same way that being a tall, genetically gifted swimmer is no guarantee of success, being a short swimmer is no guarantee of failure to reach the elite level.

Lets analyse the finalists after Rio and post their heights on a graph and see how much scatter we have.

aswimfan

Boetmate’s comment about w4x200 in Beijing inspired me to look at 2012 London sprint relay result:
in 4×100 free, Australia’s team of Coutts, Campbell, Elmslie and Schlanger with average height of 1.79 m beat USA team of Schmitt, Franklin, Vreeland and Vollmer with average height of 1.84 m

gheko

Australian 13 yr old Jenny Turrall was breaking world records at 13 yrs of age! She weighed about 5 stone and was 4ft 11in tall!

ThereaLuigi

My two cents: height is good for a swimmer but the world is so full of outliers that you must admit it can be compensated by other factors (e.g., stroke rate, connected to lung capacity and heart rate).

Giorgio Lamberti was 1,83 m and he set a record in the 200 free that lasted 10 years. 🙂

Yozhik

🙂 Moving in the water is basically all about power against water resistance. It explains the shape and swimming technic of all creatures moving in the water (sharks, whales, delfins, tunas etc). But the Nature is unpredictable and we can meet some weird and unexpected forms and moving styles. Human beings are one of such example of weirdness. 🙂
I learned many interesting stories here and was especially impressed with the Hagino’s case.
Maybe I shouldn’t have listen to my coach saying: ‘ are you kidding me? Look at the mirror. Get out from here! ‘ 🙂 🙂

ThereaLuigi

I think your coach, Yozhik, was a follower of determinism, whether or not he was aware of it. Too bad.

p.s. I wrote a reply for you under the article on the Texas victory in NCAA.

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