Spitz ’68 & ’72 Teammate Mitch Ivey ‘Banned For Life’ in US

generic

Mitch Ivey, an Olympic silver and bronze medal-winning swimmer for the USA and subsequently a national-team coach, is the latest to be added to the list of those banned for life by USA Swimming. He has until December 21 to appeal. According to the Orange County Register. Ivey, a teammate of Mark Spitz at the the 1968 and 1972 Olympic Games in Mexico and Munich, has been slapped a ban 20 years after his history of sexual misconduct was first publicly reported

All SwimVortex articles are placed in our archive after five days, the library of content available to subscribers.
Log In Register

Mitch Ivey, an Olympic silver and bronze medal-winning swimmer for the USA and subsequently a national-team coach, is the latest to be added to the list of those banned for life by USA Swimming. He has until December 21 to appeal. According to the Orange County Register. Ivey, a teammate of Mark Spitz at the the 1968 and 1972 Olympic Games in Mexico and Munich, has been slapped a ban 20 years after his history of sexual misconduct was first publicly reported

Comments

morrow3

The story is about Mitch Ivey. Mark Spitz’s name shouldn’t be brought into it at all. He has no connection to the misconduct charges and is not a part of this story. He definitely should not be in the headline.

Craig Lord

morrow3: with my media hat on and thinking beyond America, I beg to differ [and I make it very clear in copy that Ivey is linked to a who’s who of US swimming through association in sport only]. This is a man who has moved in the upper echelons of the sport for a very long time, first as a swimmer, then as a coach. If the headline says ‘Ivey’, Americans in swimming know instantly that it is of interest to read on… few beyond the US would get that, especially in the welter of sex-related abuse cases and bars on coaches in the US… but by letting the non-American reader understand instantly that this was a teammate of Mark Spitz, there is the context of Ivey’s position in a sport and in a story that would turn very sour. If someone otherwise little-know beyond his niche did something along the lines of what is alleged in the Ivey case and happened to be a former classmate of Barrack Obama’s, how many headlines do you think you’d see the name Obama in? It is in swimming’s interest well beyond America that the story is read and lessons learned among swimmers, parents, programs etc. If the word Spitz drew the eye to the story, so be it. It is a fact that Ivey was a teammate at two Games with one of the biggest names in world sport’s history.

Charlie Carson

Craig, this journalism graduate agrees with the first poster that drawing Spitz into this story in the headline isn’t appropriate. If you want to list which other prominent swimmers were his teammates in the story itself, fine.

Craig Lord

Charlie, thanks for your comment. This journalism graduate and journalist of The Times for the past 25 years begs to differ – for the reasons set out in reply to the first reader. There was no swimmer more prominent that Mark Spitz for many, many years Munich onwards – and beyond the US, he is the only name that the wider audience will recognise, which is why I can see his name in more than 20 headlines from publications around the world today and mentioned in more than 50 in one database search alone. They all appear to have taken the same media view as I did.

fartlec

Well.. the discussion is interesting indeed. the problem is not Ivey, but the fact the Spitz has been dragged in. I would say it reminds me of a late chinese common saying about the moon and the finger pointing at it (!). but here there is the real deal. are journalistic tricks effective enough to describe facts? in a way, it’s a sort of marketing, but we’re all well fed-up with marketing strategies.
I would conclude a certain part of the audience would get distracted by this. Me too, i’m not American, I’m not informed about Ivey (just heard about him as a swiommer) and no, I haven’t read this article for Spitz’s quotation. But somehow, since english is not my native language, I got the impression that Spitz was involved, even if it was clearly specified this wasn’t the case. I would say this strategy is a double-edged sword, given the importance of the article itself.
by the way, my sincere respect to mr Lord. I’m a long-time reader of yours

Craig Lord

fartlec.. I understand all points of all of you … I also think it is clear that Spitz is only there because it is a matter of fact that Ivey was a teammate and Olympic medallist on the team and at a time of one of the greats of world sport – and that was a catalyst to him becoming a figure of respect and authority. Great that you rad it anyway (and would have don had only Ivey appeared in the headline…I wager that quit a few others who read the story, not just here but in many media places mentioning Spitz, were drawn to it by the context of who Ivey is and where he sits – or sat – in the world of swimming). Regards, Craig

MPalota

The only comments here are about whether or not Spitz’s name should or should not have been mentioned?! Really??? That’s the big worry?

Mitch Ivey is an abuser and a blight on his profession and this sport. He’s been chasing and abusing teenage girls in his charge for decades. And what’s far, far worse is that everyone – and I mean everyone – knew it. Hell, Ivey married one of his swimmers – she was 18 at the time – in the late 70’s. (And, FYI, while he was married to her, he made a pass at very good friend of mine when she was only 16!)

Ivey was and is a shit. He was a shit in plain sight and those with power & influence in this sport let him get away with it for far too long.

Leave a comment

Post a comment with your SwimVortex Account. Don't have a SwimVortex Account, Sign Up?

(*) Fields are required!
×