Peru’s Mauricio Fiol Fails Doping Test; Out Of Pan Am Games For Use of Stanozolol

Just before the start of the third night of action at the Pan American Games, news broke that Peru’s Mauricio Fiol, the silver medalist in the 200 butterfly on the opening day of the meet, had tested positive for a banned substance prior to the beginning of the competition.

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Just before the start of the third night of action at the Pan American Games, news broke that Peru’s Mauricio Fiol, the silver medalist in the 200 butterfly on the opening day of the meet, had tested positive for a banned substance prior to the beginning of the competition.

Comments

aswimfan

Stanozolol? Seriously? How dumb could he be.

These days no self-respecting athletes tested positive to steroid.
You have choices of masking agents or evading tests, that’s what they get banned from these days.

Eugene

This dude seems to be unexperienced. He should consult some fellow South American swimmers how to do this properly before doping next time 😀

Craig Lord

He should swim clean, Eugene …

Ger

After his heat, the Canadian commentator remarked that Fiol has beaten his best time by 4 seconds which seemed too good to be true, and indeed we now know it was. It’s depressing to think how many athletes are out there who know how to beat the system and are happy to do it.

Wez

In no way do I condone cheating in any form.

What always boggles my mind is when cheats get caught IN COMPETITION.

If you are going to cheat, you know more or less (and should always be on the safer side) of when the PED you are using will be out your system. If I am correct, Stanozolol, depending on its form (oral or injectable) can stay in your system from 3 – 9 weeks?? Seems like a very high risk drug.

I suppose he could argue he didnt know about it, which means it could only have been the oral form, if he is telling the truth.

Eugene

Everyone should, Craig. But let’s be honest – this has gone way too far. The fact that only this Peruvian guy was caught doesn’t mean there were no doped competitors even in the same final. It would be pretty ridiculous if they take away Fiol’s medal and the bronze will be given to someone who de facto used drugs too but managed to hide them more successfully… And you know what? This situation is quite possible. But you are not a thief till you are caught, so let’s pretend that everyone else is clean and put all the shame on this unlucky dude.

Not that I justify him, but each case like this makes me think how hypocrite we all are.

Craig Lord

Hypocrisy doesn’t stretch to believing that Man A stole, therefore we’re all thieves; that is my point, Eugene. I fully appreciate that he will not be the only swimmer, if his positive is confirmed, who used banned substances to get to where he is. That does not mean that all in the race, all in that final etc etc are also taking banned substances. That isn’t true. The Canadian swimmer you mention did not hide what he took; he tested positive and gave his explanation and served his ban (for a substance far less serious that the old steroid we’re looking at).

Craig Lord

The rules are the same for all swimmers in Australia, Roy, and the pools and programs are specific: funded centres – the programs that receive official funding and status. The difference for foreign swimmers is that they now have to pay for any out-of-competition tests they are asked to submit to by ASADA while training in the country.

SteveLevy

Craig, is there any insider word on the “leadership qualities” of Peruvian Olympic Committee (COP) President Jose Quinones?

I’m thinking about the culture of international sports in Peru.

Mauro Pavoni

I am between Craig and Eugene on this… It is true that until found doped, all swimmers must be considered clean as Craig says. But we all know that only a very small part of doped swimmers are being caught. And once they are caught, to me, all offences are the same. The Canadian was as guilty as any. And those condoning those swimmers because the substances are not as bad as steroids or claim to be innocent… I am sorry but let’s all be frank about these. Rules are there to be respected and if found guilty, swimmers and athletes in all sports must pay the consequences. This Mauricio still says that he doesn’t know what happened. Steroids we are talking about… If he thinks I believe that he knows nothing about it, then I assume he thinks I am a total cretin and idiot…

Craig Lord

I’m not condoning any form of doping, Mauro, to be clear: but categorisation exists in the system and clearly – speaking in general – a product found in a cough remedy is not the same as an anabolic steroid. The differentiation is made in the system for good reason, regardless of what any of us may think of the categorisations made. I think there is common ground in all our thoughts but I believe there are plenty of clean athletes out there who are unfairly tainted by the suggestion that athlete A or B or C did it because everyone else was doing it. Untrue, as you know very well.

Mauro Pavoni

I never said they are all doing it. The vast majority are clean as we all know. I only said that not all doped athletes are caught. I know countless clean, hard working swimmers and that is why I believe they should be protected. Those caught are always given the benefit of the doubt. And the punishment dishes out at times ridiculously lenient. This guy says he does not know how it happened. Really?

Craig Lord

I know you didn’t say that Mauro … it is what is implied by some, Eugene leaning that way. I don’t find it acceptable justification and I know you feel the same.

Mauro Pavoni

Totally, Craig.

aswimfan

I agree with Eugene about existence of doping in elite sports, they are rampant of course, but it doesn’t reduce my enjoyment of following sports and watching fine sporting accomplishment. I try to keep in check my skepticism.

For example, in Monaco Diamond League, Dibaba broke Wang Junxia’s 1500m WR, a world record that is generally viewed with much suspicion, and no female runner ran under 3:54 from 1997 (again, in China) until Dibaba ran her 3:50 yesterday.
And she didn’t even look like breaking any sweat during the run, which is among the most jaw-dropping athletic accomplishments I’ve ever seen. I marvelled at the feat and her talent, and try to keep in check something that tickled in the back of my mind.

Craig Lord

aswimfan – keeping things in check needs always to be balanced with the question ‘are we being taken for fools’. I have a different take on such things reducing my enjoyment of watching great sport: it spoils it all if you think half the field, most of the field and just a couple in the field has been cheated out of their rightful place. Sport becomes a freak show no longer something to celebrate as a manifestation of human achievement.

Mauro Pavoni

BRAVO CRAIG!

Mauro Pavoni

Aswimfan.. I don’t quite know why you brought up an Athletics example. There have been lately dozens of high profile examples in Swimming lately. No one more than me loves this sport and watching it. Craig knows what I mean. BUT, will I get excited in Kazan when Efimova, Sun Yang etc swim? The answer is a resounding NO. Will I be excited when I see a certain swimmer I happen to know going to the blocks, knowing that he is 100% clean. YES I will.

Craig Lord

Good for you, Mauro

aswimfan

Mauro,

I think I worded my sentences wrong, in fact, I agree with you. Of course, I do not enjoy when a proven cheaters are on the block, whether it’s Sun Yang in swimming or Tyson Gay in track.

And whenever someone suddenly performed extraordinary athletic feat, I also don’t immediately think that person is doping, regardless of where they are from. I don’t discriminate whether they are USAmericans or Ethiopian or Chinese or whether they train with Dave Salo at Trojans swimming club, until proven cheating of course. I don’t claim my position is the most correct, but I think it’s quite healthy which allows me to enjoy sports without being too cynical or skeptic.

Yozhik

“Bravo Craig!” ???? Mauro, don’t you hear what Craig said. The contemporary professional sport is just a show where he doesn’t want to be taken for fools. Ask Craig, what he thinks elite swimmers will answer on the question if they are here to celebrate the manifestation of human achievements? If they are sincere with their answers then take it as definition of this business.
This is the show that gathers the largest audience. Larger than any other forms of entertainment. The show that involves a great deal of money and feeds a lot of people. So if there is a reward then there will be always attempts to cheat if the risk worth it. This erosion will not stop by itself or because cheaters got ashamed. It will stop only if it damages the business by itself. To influence the public opinion that most sponsors are sensitive to is one of the way to do so. Ant that is I think what this site is trying to achieve. Meanwhile, unless it gets rotten like it happened to cycling when a “talented manipulator” was able to keep everybody quiet for seven years I will enjoy this show and will take the Aswimfan’s position – strongly condemning each case of doping but not crying about killed love when it happens from time to time.

Craig Lord

Your thoughts on business and human nature are easy to follow but that last position is your’s to have, Yozhik, and is not one I share. I feel differently – perhaps that is because I see (and have seen) the damage far more closely than you, in the eyes and emotions and feelings of the kids and coaches and parents and programs that do indeed do it clean and get hammered by fans, media and more alike each time they produce a ‘disappointing silver’, ‘poor fourth’ and so on and forth. I’ve also seen the damage of doping in the lives of those fed the bad stuff by people who are very far away when it comes to coping with such things for the rest of a life beyond days of racing. Swimming (among other sports) is a community that includes victims of abuse as well as those who take a deliberate decision to cheat. When I see it, when suspicion and corroborating evidence meet in a sad marriage, regardless of a positive test, then, yes, sport is spoiled, what unfolds no longer worth celebrating. Time to time is for all-time for some of those affected. You, of course, need only look, cheer and then look away.

Mauro Pavoni

Craig, this may not please Youzhik and many others, but I wholeheartedly, totally and unreservedly endorse everything you said. I have no time for people who condone, justify or brush off doping as “just one of those things” or “we all know these things happen, so what?”. Swimmers, coaches, parents and all their connections devote life to this wonderful sport. It is not fair that they are robbed of a final, a medal or a win because someone else decided to dope. The same swimmers who are robbed earn zero money. Zilch. Nothing at all. And they spend thousands and thousands of pounds training every day for up to 6 hrs a day. Would any of you be pleased if then a swimmer uses doping to go faster than he can with normal means? The worst moment of 17 years of watching live swimming at all levels for me was Budapest Euro 2010. To see that doped swimmer laughing on the podium and kissing his medal in the 200 fly was one of the lowest moments of my life

Craig Lord

Thank you Mauro – we should hear more from those whose lives are affected by cheats, the folk often overlooked and sidelined in every sense when it comes to dopers prospering and being celebrated.

Mauro Pavoni

Sadly Craig, the world is more attracted by dopers than the victims on the other hand of the spectrum… Like in life in general, good news does not sell…. It is the bad news who always wins.. Sad but true. But I say this to dopers. Past, present or future. They may win races, medals, sponsors, money and fame. But they will always be losers…

Yozhik

Craig and Mauro, yes I am an outsider and neither my life nor lives of my relatives were affected by cheating in sports. The only case that I witnessed closely was doping in college when it was done for the sake of scholarship. This person has changed from sport lover to sport hater after graduation. And maybe for good. Therefore if you got undeservedly hurt by the person who doesn’t know what he is talking about (victims feelings and damaged souls) then please accept my sincere apology. I just wanted to share the observations that we have to understand what we are struggling against and tears is not what will stop this evil from spreading.

Craig Lord

Thanks Yozhik… I cry no tears nor am I personally wounded but I see the hurt and damage done and it spoils sport; I’m well aware of the reasons why people cheat. Understanding that doesn’t make it right, of course.

Ger

I am surprised that the penalties for swimmers, or any athletes, do not extend to criminal prosecutions. After all, there is fraud involved; government funding, deceiving sponsors and other athletes, etc. People are sent to jail for less.

Mauro Pavoni

Ger… Amen to that…

Mauro Pavoni

Yozhik… You have nothing to apologise for. You did not offend anyone. I know that unless one is part of the connections of a swimmer who is on the receiving end of dopers’ cheating, it is very difficult to fully understand the frustration and anger we all feel. As Ger quite rightly pointed out, dopers are guilty of fraud, illegal practices and crimes worthy of punishments well beyond farcical 3 months off training and all that rubbish. Doping stays in the athletes’ system well after they are found of doping and (one hopes) stop using illegal aids to pump up their performances. I look forward to Kazan and can’t wait till the action starts, but I know that when swimmers go on those blocks, the question that I and many others with me will ask is “wouldn’t it be nice to think that they are all clean?”.

Yozhik

Mauro, I am touched by what you are saying and it is almost inhuman to come up with pragmatic view after reading such emotional statements of yours. If you don’t have anything better to do then read my next couple posts. Otherwise skip them – nothing important

Yozhik

Well.. Whatever Ger is proposing is impossible because no criminal law can be applied in situation when one unfairness competes with another. The competitive sport is regulated by rules that awards those who are more naturally gifted. Gifted by huge muscles, longer arms, large feet, better nerve or endocrine systems etc. Those rules protect such unfair advantages. If it’s done by God then it is fair. If athlete’s natural ability are increased as a result of achievement of science about human body then it is not fair. Please note that we are not talking here about excitement of achievement like getting to the top of the mountain. The excitement that we want to share with everybody. We are talking about recognition and glory that comes with prizes and awards – things that no athlete wants to share. That is the competitive sport. Therefore I don’t have much empathy to those guys in your case who were rubbed from medals. Should they be fairly awarded because it were them who are more gifted? When you are talking about “sweat and tears, blood and hardworking” then who told you that cheaters are working less? If you are saying that sport is about triumph of will and ability to push to the limits, then how to measure it? The cheaters are breaking the rules of competitive sport as we know it and have to be punished. So fair it is or not whoever is stronger thanks to his parent’s genetics has to be prized. I don’t have any problem with that, but I don’t get emotionally traumatized in cases when someone who had no chances decided to bypass the rules and to correct such “God’s unfairness”. Got back to your place, criminal. No pie for you. It is only for blessed ones !!! What if we oblige winners to pay for loser’s expenses? That will probably solve the problem of cheating 🙂 I am pretty much sure that only economical approaches will solve to some extent problem of doping.

Yozhik

I am totally with Craig that we MUST protect our children from the rotten influence of those who are trying to cheat in sport. The lesson of corruption received in the pool at young age will produce a poison fruits later in adult life. But is it us (good guys) who are making such things possible? My young son was above average swimmer in his age group. Because of that we pushed him very hard to practice twice a day tempting him with a glory of winning. He lost at local final competition. He was in tears. My words that the experience of lost will help him in adult life were of a little comfort to him. If at this moment someone gave him a few pills to help him to win I almost sure that he would take it. So huge was his disappointment and feelings of unfairness after dedicating so much efforts. My child suffered and not because of being affected by cheating but because of fair completion for getting awarded. So Mauro I am familiar with similar feelings of yours. But it was my stupid paternal pride that aimed him in this direction. It had nothing to do with celebration of personal achievements of pure sport but a desire to win. It was me who made him suffer. I’m glad that his sport career stopped at high school.

Craig Lord

Yozhik: some valuable experience from Caitlin Leverenz:
http://www.swimvortex.com/caitlin-leverenz-failure-is-not-final-its-the-road-to-success/

Craig Lord

Natural gifts are not unfair, Yozhik – they are of the world. I agree that hitting cheats in the pocket is the way to go. Having sponsors and others take a certain cyclist to court to demand the return of money is probably one of the more scary outcomes for many who are tempted to cheat not just for fame (ego plays a big part, and not only that of the athlete, sometimes not that of the athlete at all, in a pigmalion world) but for fortune. Micro-dosing is allowing a lot of folk to get away with cheating. The system will, eventually, catch-up … and there ought to be a return of funds clause in all current contracts and associations.

Mauro Pavoni

Yozhik, thanks for your posts. I read them all and in all their details. One thing I can summarise with is that I will never complain that Thorpe had size 17 feet, that Phelps armspan was wider and longer than that of a giant albatross or that the average size of swimmers at top level is 1m90cm or taller. A swimmer I know is 1.75, size 9 feet and his armspan is a quarter of that of Phelps. What nature gifts certain swimmers compared to others is totally legal. Doping and all that is cheating and should be made illegal. Thanks

Yozhik

This discussion goes too far from Mauricio Fiol’s case and getting kind of personal to be continued at public forum. Thank you for the reference to Caitlin Leverenz. I like it. What I learned from it that overcoming a failure is a very personal process. Sometimes the damage can be beyond the point of repair. Most of people who give good advices are never been seriously involved. Whoever went through it and considered it a blessing don’t want to have such blessing again. Should we consider the Sport with his micro failures and recoveries going back to back as a good way to train our characters? I don’t think so. I think of it as numbers of scars to our souls that leads with time to loosing of sensitivity.

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