Natalie Coughlin Ignites Pan Am Games With 10th-Ranked MR Of 53.85 in 100 Freestyle

Solid start for Natalie Coughlin by Patrick B. Kraemer

Pan Am Games, Toronto – day 1 heats: Natalie Coughlin’s meet record of 53.85 in the 100 freestyle got the Pan American Games rolling.

All SwimVortex articles are placed in our archive after five days, the library of content available to subscribers.
Log In Register

Pan Am Games, Toronto – day 1 heats: Natalie Coughlin’s meet record of 53.85 in the 100 freestyle got the Pan American Games rolling.

Comments

Bad Anon

Coughlin definitely hitting her stride, if she keeps doing what she’s doing, she’ll be in contention for an individual Olympic spot for the 100free ; at the last trials for 2012 games it took a 54.15 to earn the individual, in Omaha next summer it 53.50 may just make the top 2

aswimfan

This is such a stunning swim by Natalie.

To post fastest swim after 4 years and at the age of 32? Incredible.

aswimfan

Bad Anon, as much as I admire and respect Natalie, it will definitely take faster than 53.50 to make USA individual 100 spot next year. And I will be flabbergasted if Natalie swim 53low next year. But in line with my prediction, I think she will have great chance to make the relay.

Bad Anon

I will put my money on 53.50 for the 100free and 59.50 for the 100back ; I think I will be a lot closer than most in my predictions. For starters, even the current fastest sprinters haven’t been swimming these times in the last 12months ; it’ll take a miracle to have two US women faster than 53.5 at trials, though 5 may be under 54.00

Dee

I’m with Badanon on this one. We saw at the French trials, when swimmers are bunched, things can get tight and the end result isn’t as fast as expected. 53.5 to make the team individually looks about right to me. Poor Aussies must be thinking sub 53 to make it… brutal.

Ger

NC’s heat from today:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t2EN6q2kZQ4

Craig Lord

Thanks Ger – embedded

Crannman

Cullen Jones needs to retire . He simply has nothing left in the tank . 50.09 is literally atrocious

gheko

Chantal Van Landeghem won the 100m free in 53.83 and also won gold in the 4x100m, she had good form last year winning 50m free bronze at pan pacs 24.5

gheko

Natalie Coughlin was upset in the women’s 100-meter freestyle final Tuesday at the Pan American Games, finishing second to Canada’s Chantal Van Landeghem.

Coughlin had a strong start and led for about the first half-lap but battled with Van Landeghem and Arianna Vanderpool-Wallace down the stretch. Van Landeghem, pleasing the hometown crowd in Toronto, finished with a personal-best 53.83 and was followed by Coughlin (54.06) and Vanderpool-Wallace (54.15).

Coughlin, a 12-time Olympic medalist who was the heavy favorite going into the evening final, lost later in another showdown with Van Landeghem in the 4×100 freestyle relay. The U.S. team lost the lead during Coughlin’s anchor leg against Van Landeghem and finished second to Canada.

easyspeed

For some reason swimmers and swim fans seem to think 30s are “over the hill.” Well, as I’ve said over and over, that simply is not the case. How much more evidence do we need? Apparently some are still not convinced.

easyspeed

There are advantages and disadvantages to being a swimmer in your late 20s, early to mid 30s vs. teens compared to teens and early 20s.

Re: the former: you are stronger, have better endurance (assuming you didn’t retire one or more times), you have maturity and experience. Cons = slower recovery time and psychological burnout.

Of course there is variation from person to person.

easyspeed

*sorry, phone was going a bit haywire while typing.. Any way to edit after posting?

Yozhik

Easyspeed, I am not sure of what you are trying to convey with your message. Is it that there is no such thing in swimming like “over the hill” anymore? Or that this “hill” has to be moved much father and you can give some guidance where it can possibly be? In the case of women swimming the situation has changed just recently and mostly because the sociological factor is not that dominating any more. Many girls (at least in USA) usually stopped actively participating in competitive swimming after college and were busy with some more important for them social agenda. Now the situation has changed and sport life became longer. First of all there is some possibility of making living from swimming. And secondly there are dramatic changes in training techniques that rely more now on science of swimming then on old school empirical methods. So more reserves of human body can be revealed.

easyspeed

@Yozhik: the line moved, that’s what I am saying. Elite swimming is possible in one’s 30s. That is a change in the sport and I agree with the reasons you cited. Lezak, Torres and others showed it was possible. Some fans, coaches and athletes are still stuck in the old way of thinking: your prime is 23 and it’s downhill from there. There are limits, however. Don’t think we will see 50 year old Olympic swimmers.

Craig Lord

I think there has been a shift easyspeed and you make a valid point … BUT :)… pre-25 is still the norm when it comes to making big podiums and the figures have not shifted significantly across the board in the past 20 years. Shiny suits skewed the view a touch: Jason L and Dara Torres over 100m free were at their best pre 2005.

easyspeed

Well, the jury is still out; pro swimming is a relatively recent phenomenon. As far as the suit changes, that is a confounding variable making it impossible to compare lifetime bests of athletes that have careers that span the suit changes. What we do know is Lezak was the oldest competitor yet had the fastest 100 free relay split in Beijing. Same with Torres, missed the 50 free gold by a hair and everyone had on a tech suit just like her.

easyspeed

Also to my point: Lezak was at his best in 2008. When he was younger he might have been faster but he didn’t have the experience or perhaps psychological maturity to “get it done” at the right time. Prior to that he tended to disappoint in big meets.

Craig Lord

easyspeed, yes, I get the maturity thing – I think Therese Alshammar and such folk have some truly valuable lessons and tips to pass on; and I’m fully supportive of the move to have swimmers take charge of their professional status and extend their careers for as long as they’re thriving and enjoying it. Natalie Coughlin – terrific. Separate note – without being personal about it, for that was never my point, I take many times up to 200 in particular and even 400m from 2008-09 with a pinch of salt in terms of our ability to judge how good they really were: one of the biggest reasons why the suits needed to be sunk was because they conferred different levels of advantage to different individuals and skewed results across the board. ‘They all had a suit on’ simply doesn’t work as an argument.

John Lohn

Backing up Craig’s point about the different levels of influence of the suits, I covered Brendan Hansen very closely for many years. Brendan was one of the athletes who got nothing out of the suits. He was technically brilliant without them from wall to wall, and the suits allowed others to nullify his natural advantages.

Leave a comment

Post a comment with your SwimVortex Account. Don't have a SwimVortex Account, Sign Up?

(*) Fields are required!
×