Mitch Larkin Cracks Commonwealth Record With 52.26 100 Back Win At Doha World Cup

Mitchell Larkin - by Patrick B. Kraemer

Australia’s double world backstroke champion Mitch Larkin was at it again this evening: a 52.26 two-lap victory at the Doha round of the World Cup not only established his best ever 100m backstroke inside the time in which he claimed one of his global crowns back in August but established a Commonwealth and Australian record as 6th best ever, fourth in textile

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Australia’s double world backstroke champion Mitch Larkin was at it again this evening: a 52.26 two-lap victory at the Doha round of the World Cup not only established his best ever 100m backstroke inside the time in which he claimed one of his global crowns back in August but established a Commonwealth and Australian record as 6th best ever, fourth in textile

Comments

ThereaLuigi

Since everyone else will talk about the Aussie backstrokers – and with good reason! – let me make a minor point: Le Clos, it seems to me, is becoming a very solid and convincing freestyler.

Agnel’s return to some kind of race form is also good news.

Bad Anon

Mitch and Emily both on a roll. if they can match their double golds from Kazan in Rio ; C1/C2 sweep the sprint freestyles and the Aussie relays perform to their potential then Australia has a chance of dethroning USA as the no1 swimming nation in Rio. Seebohm’s 2.07low very impressive. She’s always flying home ; she’d have to.be within 0.5 sec from Franklin on the last 50 to stand a chance in Rio

ThereaLuigi

Roy, I know he is a versatile swimmer and most flyers are also good freestylers but I believe he has made a lot of progress, specifically in the 100 freestyle, in the current year. I haven’t checked the records, I could be under a false impression.

Craig Lord

Therealuigi, Roy:

Strong progress on best times:

48.16 2015
48.53 2014
48.95 2013
49.65 2012

ThereaLuigi

Thanks, Craig. A steady progress indeed, not just this past year. 48.16 is already good enough to get a spot into ANY 4×100 free relay quartet in the world. Impressive.

Yozhik

It is funny that nobody besides Luigi discussed this obvious progress that cannot be just a side effect of Le Clos’ fly training process. It is also interesting that this strong trend was noticed by the person who doesn’t even remember exact numbers to support his observations. I think Luigi is a day trader who is trained to feel slightest trend by each cell of his skin 🙂

ThereaLuigi

Now come on Yozhik. I am sure a lot of people has noticed Le Clos’ progress, starting with Craig and other journalists and visitors of this website. His 48.16 was set this past August (I have just checked). It must have stuck in the back of my mind, that’s all. You will notice that I DID make a mistake: I said he has improved in the “current” year, when, as Craig has demonstrated, the improvement has been going on steadily since 2012. So, thank you very much, but no magic here 🙂

Yozhik

So, Roy which way do you think he is leaning: Sjostrom or Phelps? Based on the data presented by Craig, it looks like Le Clos is targeting elite status at freestyle.

Craig Lord

Roy, don’t forget that Phelps had impressive 100 free speed, too – mainly geared to the relays for the US and required for those stunning meet tallies but also, at one small window before James Magnussen popped a 47.1, a solo ambition.

On Chad and breaststroke:

Chad le Clos from an article in which he spoke to SwimVortex in 2014 after he withdrew from the 400IM at C Games:

A medley focus takes Le Clos back to his swim roots: he was a Commonwealth youth medley and breaststroke champion but a groin injury placed him on a different path in 2009 and by 2011 “my breaststroke just fell away”, he recalled.

That remains a weakness. “It’s been a case of slowly building it up,” says Le Clos. “The problem is that I tend to overwork it and I get niggles along the way. We’re taking baby steps with it and if it doesn’t happen this year or next year, it will happen by 2016.”

So, the medley ambition is declared. A solo 100 free ambition is not – but how useful is a 48.1 freestyle on the last lap of a 200IM… the question remains open. We will see within the year.

aswimfan

I think Larkin has more upshot in 100 than in 200. The older and stronger he becomes, the faster he gets in shorter distances.

He definitely has more potential to break Peirsol’s 100 WR than his 200 WR.

Wez

The results are really interesting indeed. Majority of the RSA men are all from the same training squad. This is all part of a training program that tows a great deal of work over the last few weeks. The guys will be feeling it, and I think that reflects in their times. CLC’s ability to step up and swim hard was always there. He seemed to go through a bit of a rough patch, but I was chatting to him the other day, and his focus and determination is the way it was before London. (I would know, I was there to witness it in the training pool). I expect some big things to come if this is how he is going.

Wez

@aswimfan, totally agree with the Mitch Larkin statement. Obviously we cant predict which way his training is being veered towards (this close to OG with that kind of form, you would expect him to go for the double) but the likelihood of his 100 becoming even stronger is quite possible.

ThereaLuigi

I found a video of Le Clos’ 48.16. The 2nd lap is something to behold, he literally destroys the field. He is in lane 8, bottom of the screen. Kind of “galloping” stroke.

https://youtu.be/snTTZx3Xp2w

(That is another thing he has in common with M.Phelps. Phelps, when he gets his turn right, can swim a mean 100. Look what he did in Pan Pacs 2010, first relay leg, 48.13. The time he swam would have won the solo race.)

Bad Anon

Larkin very much in reach of Lochte’s 1.52.96. It would be a good idea for Larkin to go after (world) records now then focus on winning gold in Rio ; an.olympic gold medal is worth more than a wr. Recall Kirsty Coventry broke Coughlin’s 100back wr in the semis in Beijing ; gold was won by Coughlin in a slower time than wr and everyone remembers the gold medal winner not the one who set a WR

commonwombat

WRs happen ….. when they happen. With regards to Larkin and his Rio prospects, I still feel that the 200 may be his best chance of Gold given that he currently has a “gap” on his competition whereas the 100 still remains a shoot-out with a number of tightly grouped competitors.

Should he decide to go “another cycle” then I could well agree with those touting the 100 becoming his stronger event.

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