M100 Free: Cameron McEvoy Leads Federico Grabich, Santo Condorelli; Ning* Wins

Ning Zetao of China - by Patrick B. Kraemer
Ning Zetao of China - by Patrick B. Kraemer

Australian Cameron McEvoy stopped the clock at 47.95 as the first swimmer home with a clean record, Federico Grabich taking an historic medal for Argentina in 48.12 and the man he pipped for Pan Am gold, Santo Condorelli, of Canada, next closest on 48.19 but locked out of the medals. The first man home was Ning Zetao* in 47.84.

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Comments

gheko

Well done Cameron, next year mate!

Wez

His “in pool applause” looked extremely sarcastic… could have just been me…

Personal Best

Well, you could say that McEvoy actually did really well. It wasn’t his fastest time, but he put together three really good swims and swam almost a perfect race in the final.

His performances in the 100 have been really good the past few years; very consistent.

Eugene

Unexpected! Chinese took all the male freestyle excepting 200 so far.
Too bad Morozov was missing in the final. I’m still not sure whether it was false start or new level of reaction.

Ger

Wez, I thought that too.

jean Bodon

Eugine, it was expected and it shows that doping really works! Ning in the last 10 meters of the race reminded me of Armstrong and Ben Johnson’s surreal finishes.

jean Bodon

Sorry Eugene, my computer auto corrects

Henry He

jean Bodon, whether Ning doped or not to get this medal is a call should be coming from official channel.

Henry He

Craig, just for curiosity, what did Ning say at the press conference that made you put below line :)?

“It is the line that no-one in swimming wants to hear and the explanations and excuses will flow and the lame and false accusations of racism with them. “

Craig Lord

He said nothing that made me write that line – I wrote it within minutes of the race finishing, Henry. It is based on having heard the same tired and sorry retort for the past 25 years, that’s all. Sun Yang said it again the other day. His reaction to a question was to to say ‘which country are you from’. When the reporter said Switzerland, Sun wasn’t quite sure what to do with that…. That’s because the question was irrelevant in the first place and based on falsehoods and false assumptions and orchestrated lines. I know very many reporters who have put reasonable but hard questions on doping matters – as far as I can tell – and in some cases I know for certain for they are long-term colleagues and friends – there isn’t a racist or ant-china anti-russia anti-brazil etc bone in their collective bodies. They are asking reasonable questions in the face of a festering pretence at clean sport by some who think we should celebrate their ‘achievements’ when they’ve been proven to have fallen foul of the rules that are designed to protect clean sport and clean athletes. Hope that answers your question.

Craig Lord

Henry, official channels did find he doped (irrelevant whether it was for a specific moment or came with explanations that leave many still doubting the authenticity of what unfolds before us in the pool). The substance he doped with, like many such products, helps to build form that can last in the body for many years – well beyond periods of suspension – according to latest research. It is one of the reasons, among several, why some think that those who test positive should be banned for life, no comeback, for the highest category of offences, notwithstanding the arguments for leniency under certain circumstances if a body such as CAS so decides.

Verram

What’s happened to Nathan Adrian? Is he injured or ill?

DDias

Craig Lord,
so, we will ban the whole China?

They use Clenbuterol in meat.If the effects last that much, a newcomer in swimming ingesting contaminated meat for years have a HUGE advantage among others, even if he doesn’t doping.

Did you saw that: http://swimswam.com/mexicos-daniel-ramirez-says-he-never-swam-entered-times/

Any thoughts?

Eugene

Jean, the fact that he was once tested positive doesn’t mean he is on doping right now. That also doesn’t mean that others where clean for the last couple of years. In fact, athletes who already have at least one offence must be much more careful than others. But we may only guess, how others were preparing for the World Champs.

Also Clenbuterol seems to be another strange drug for a swimmer. I knew few people who used it for burning fat, while pumping iron in gym. But what kind of gains swimmers expect to get from it? Maybe Ning used to be fat back then? 🙂

Craig Lord

Eugene – please do not name athletes (removed from your comment) who NEVER tested positive and have shown NO signs of ever having cheated in your spurious suggestions that we should excuse cheats because everyone else is doing it. Totally unacceptable. Last time of asking.
As for clenbuterol and sport: tons of evidence and research and medical papers online that the reader can look up for themselves that tell us precisely why sports people who want to cheat might use it. Not just about burning fat. There are sound reasons why WADA experts place it on their list. Of course, you may be wiser than all of them.

Craig Lord

If the federation did such a thing they should face a penalty; the swimmer is not to blame, DDias. The issue is minor compared with what else is going on in kazan and the sport, however, and not worth my time and energy 🙂
If FINA kept and cared for proper records, they would have known the times were fake
A few years ago, Hungary invented a whole Olympic qualification meet; knocks the above example into a cocked hat 🙂

Craig Lord

Clebuterol is banned in livestock use by the Chinese govt, DDias, according to many reports from and in China in the past decade since the scandal (not sport, general) – and was banned at the time of the positive test.
the story has moved on… yes, it is used illegally still (and not only in china) but world-class athletes live under fairly strict controlled environments and there are rules to observe – very simple.
“The illegal use of clenbuterol in porcine feed in China has led to an overhaul in Chinese food industry regulations and calls for scientists to develop more stringent testing techniques for the chemical.” 2010 – 2011 … lots of news items on it all… and since 2006-2007, official warnings from the Chinese state. If you take part in WORLD not domestic sport, you have to abide by the same rules as everyone else … and if that measn care in your diet, then you must take it… no excuses.

DDias

Craig Lord,
about Mexico fake times:

My problem with that case is the fact it is an EASY thing to prove.A blatant disrespect with their own rules.What type of things do they do at closed doors?

Brian Palmer

Craig, you are a legend for naming it how it is! Seeing swimmers given suspensions that are effectively in name only and then immediately reinstated to competition within months when the training benefits continue for years robs us all. I feel for swimmers who swim clean and give of the best years of their youth to be cheated by frauds. Thank you for saying what many of us feel. Keep on publishing the ‘*’.

Verram

Any news or updates or interviews with Nathan Adrian?? The Olympic champion in the 100 free has not really been swimming all that well the last couple of seasons..

Chris Dolan

No mention of his ban on the BBC by the commenters or in the studio although Moorhouse did mention the two bans by the Russian Female swimmer during her semi.
I don’t like the words “Drug Cheat” because that is not necessary the case and its lazy to lump all cases together. However those who come back don’t always show contrition and its hard to sympathise when they don’t.

Personal Best

Not sure many drug cheats, or those who have (intentionally or otherwise) doped will say much about that after the facts.

History shows us many athletes tend to brush these facts away.

Would it make a difference? What can they say? “I did it because everyone else is doing it” ?

Are others doing it? Who knows? Positive results aplenty seem to suggest that.

The real question is what are the powers that be doing about that?

Still doesn’t mean we have to forgive the athlete.

aswimfan

Roy,

the prettiest one is Lu Ying.
The least pretty one is Sun Yang.

I know It’s got nothing to do with swimming, but since you mentioned popularity..

aswimfan

Sun Yang, Ye Shiwen and Ning Zetao have something in common:
Their closing speed is unreal and out of this world.

Zhen Sun

Citing some latest research to support a life-time ban does not seem wise. The evidence you cited was a study done by Olso biologists on 6 female mice (I was shocked to find they only used 6 mice. The significance was apparently achieved by increasing the number of fibers that they observe. But still the fibers come from only 6 mice). It’s sad that people often easily buy results that are consistent with their prior belief, without questioning the quality of the research.

The more urgent issue is, in my opinion, how to effectively catch the dopers. To protect innocent athletes, doping tests need to control the level of “false positive”, which naturally leads to high level of “false negative”: traces of substance that cannot be confidently determined as positive have to be let go. I think we have recently heard about a case that sounds similar.

For example, in London 2012, the test of testosterone allows the athletes to have a level that is no more than 4 times his/her normal level (constructed from the bio-passport). That means two things: 1. you are considered innocent if your testosterone is 3.9 times as high as you normally have; 2. it would not be easy to catch you if you consistently inject testosterone so that your “normal” level is high.

Trick 2 may be costly but trick 1 is possible if the athletes have a good supporting doctor team. The recent French study on 8 athletes (though the sample is still ridiculously small, at least it’s larger than 6 and it used athletes, instead of mice) indicates micro-doping could never be detected and suggests it’s going on in many places. The study was later acknowledged by WADA but no solution can be provided at this stage. In fact, Armstrong had long used this trick, together with some other techniques.

I think one direction to improve is to publish the detailed test results in major competitions, instead of only publishing the positive/negative outcomes. The decision still has to be made at the threshold but the public can judge on their own. Well I am not sure that helps but a death penalty certainly is not the solution.

Zhen Sun

The suggestion means it would be suspicious if an athlete often shows high level of substance that are right below the triggering critical value. He/she would still be clean technically, but the public can have a different opinion.

lucy Ben

aswimfan,
Why do you think the speed of Sun Yang, Ye Shiwen and Ning Zetao are unreal and out of this world? Just because they are Chinese? What about Ledecky? BTW, Ning’s speed in not the fastest in history. Which world are you living in?

aswimfan

Is there blood passport system in swimming?

If not, swimming should start it immediately. Sure, the current cheaters can have advantage by having already elevated level, but if not now, then when?

lucy Ben

I simply trust the authority. Their urine will be retained for many years. Without any evidence, who calling them cheaters is a real cheater.

aswimfan

I thought my pick for GBR to win 4×100 medley over USA was a bit adventurous, but oh my how bad Adrian has become.

Since winning Olympics, he only swam three 47high, and all of those were in Barcelona. He hasn’t breached 48 in the past two years.

And now suddenly men 4×100 medley is pretty much open between three countries: GBR, USA, AUS

aswimfan

It still annoys me to hell that someone who did clenbuterol won, the same feeling I had when Herasimenya won Shanghai.

so annoying.

aswimfan

Anyway, as I have said a week ago (and which I deservedly got chastised), the men 100 free lost its lustre when Magnussen pulled out. And turned out I wasn’t that wrong after all.

Josh Jeffrey

I’m pretty sure Zetao isn’t going to beat Manaudou in the 50 free. Florent can swim 21s in his sleep these days and is primed for a big swim.

Aswimfan, I agree: Ying Lu is really pretty.

Craig: Hoshi isn’t just the first Japanese female butterfly gold medalist, she’s their first female gold medalist at a Worlds EVER. They have something like 24 silver and bronzes and until today, no gold. Great for Hoshi to be the one to change that; she’s been so consistent for so long.

Craig Lord

Josh – thanks – the w200 fly story was penned by John on the button. FYI: The details of firsts, all-time ranks moves and all that stuff is contained in our Analysis files for Gold subscribers.

Craig Lord

lucy Ben – those considered to have cheated are those who tested positive and served time out, lucy B – the ‘cheater’ lines is way too surface. It is the backdrop that counts. There are whole teams in Kazan (leading and lesser) that haven’t had a positive test in their midst in the past two decades – and no it is not because they’re too sophisticated to get caught … it is, to a very large extent, because they are NOT cheating or seeking ways to cheat or get one over on the rest while pretending they are the real deal … and then when they get caught they find excuses and call everyone else a liar, cheat, racist etc … The authorities never caught Armstrong/Jones etc etc – I would temper your trust.

Craig Lord

He’s living in the world that tells us two of those you mention tested positive for banned substances, Lucy B

Craig Lord

No Zhen, the death penalty is not the solution but a lifetime ban is. Those who test positive in the highest category should go. There would be some rather more careful reading of Codes and labels if that were the case; time for excuses if well past its sell-by date. Yes, there may be some who mess up without intending to cheat but most who suddenly find a steroid, a bit of EPO etc etc in their blood are high likely to have put it there themselves or had it put there by others, deliberately.

Craig Lord

Yes, and a few others, aswimfan. It is that roar at the end and when it need of catching up and finding a position from which to win that is highly unusual and visibly noticeable not only to the expert eye but the casual observer. It is a ‘did you see that?!’ moment; a moment where you can almost imagine calculation to be playing a part; and while those happen off turns when folk like Lochte are at their very best, it is truly rare to see that king of surge mid-swim, a change of tempo, rate when you would not expect to see it – we’ve seen it with Sun and Ning this week and 2 others this week – and we saw it at London 2012, too.

aswimfan

Josh,

What?? she’s the first Japanese female worlds gold medallist?

So stunned. You’d think they’d won at least two or something.

And Craig, I can’t access the all time analysis.. I’m only a silver 🙁

aswimfan

Lucy,

I pretty much live in the real world.

Please read my sentences more carefully: I didn’t say just “speed”, I said “closing speed”.

Just watch the race again if you didn’t believe me:
http://www.dailymotion.com/video/x30ltti_men-s-100m-freestyle-final-world-swimming-championships-kazan-2015_sport

Between 75 m to 90 m Ning was clearly behind mcEvoy, but somehow he was able to change gear and tempo and accelerating between 85-90 to the finish. And we know mcEvoy was not slowing down much as he kept his gap against all the other swimmers.

In elite men’s 100 m freestyle, this is very rare. In 100 free sprint it’s usually who had the smallest deceleration, but instead Zetao was accelerating. I can’t think any other top sprinter, male or female, who can do that, meaning changing tempo and accelerating in the final metres in 100 free.

Mentioning Ledecky breaks your argument. Ledecky is fast, indeed she is awfully fast throughout her race, but compare to her cruising speed, Ledecky’s closing speed is good but not that great.
In 400 and 200 finals, her last 50 is not even the fastest among the finalist.

Sun Yang spit 25 in both of his WR swim in the last 50 in his 1,500 (yes, 1,500), something that no 200 free finalist was able to do at both 2011 Shanghai and 2012 London.

You don’t think it’s unreal? You don’t seem to watch or follow swimming then. Even Thorpe who was famously known for his great turbo kick during the last lap was able to split only 26 in his 400 once I think.

As for Shiwen’s closing speed, we all know about her London race, right.
And I never mean to accuse Shiwen of anything as she never tested positive to banned sentences, but Yang and Zetao have.

aswimfan

Forgot to add. McEvoy who is a 1:45 freestyler obviously did not die in the last few meters, and that is what made Ning’s final metres acceleration even more stunning.

aswimfan

Lucy,

urine?
many drugs or markers are not detected in urine, especially in very low quantity. Even blood is not ideal if not compared to their normal levels, that’s why blood passport is very important.

Also, you said you trust the authority? seriously?
the cycling authority was involved in the positive result cover up of Lance Armstrong.
The good thing that came out of Armstrong scandal is that cycling now has the best and most comprehensive doping test among all sports. Now that it’s perfect, though.

Josh Jeffrey

Aswimfan – They’ve won golds at SC Worlds, but until Hoshi, a Japanese woman had never won gold at a long course Worlds. Pretty amazing stuff, but how awesome is that for Hoshi? I hope this gives her the confidence to do great things in Rio. She has a beautiful stroke and her acceleration towards the end of races is very Sjostrom-like.

aswimfan

Here’s the state of the affairs of men’s freestyle:

Winning times from 2000 Sydney/2001 Fukuoka would have won all the men’s freestyle events already swum so far.

bkkang Kang

CME had a tough 200M Final competition beforehand and mostly not 100% fresh for the 100M final where he lost to Ning and he applauded the latter victory with gentlemanly grace . Great sportsmanship and commendable unlike some of us insinuating ‘cooked up stories’ . (Ning’s pb 37.65, CME is 37.60.)

aswimfan

“Now that it’s perfect, though.”

should be “Not that it’s perfect, though.”

Zhen Sun

aswimfan,

Talking about someone accelerating in the last meters is like talking about Bolt accelerating in his last meters. No they are not, they are all fading. It’s only who fades less.

Even with a rough video stopper, you can calculate their average speed. With the help of 15 m and 25 m markers, the speed for McEvoy between 75 to 85 is about 1.96m/s, for Ning about 1.92m/s. The last 15m McEvoy averaged 1.73m/s, Ning 1.80m/s. The fading for both is quite clear and significant so no one is accelerating.

Craig Lord

Zhen, that doesn’t quite do it… you would expect what you suggest … but you can still surge when slowing down; it is relative and significant – and it is what happened… the naked eye doesn’t lie; it was obvious.

Zhen Sun

Craig,

You believe “most swimmers are clean while some of the cheats got caught”. I believe it too, otherwise there is no fun watching the game. But that’s just a belief. So far empirical evidence does not separate it from the other belief that you hate: “a lot of them cheat but those that are not sophisticated enough are caught.” The testing procedure simply does not provide evidence to separate them. Without improvement in this direction, arguing for tougher punishment based on some ambiguous evidence on long term effect of doping is really secondary. In fact, tougher sanctions could only increase the disparity between countries.

At least I’d like to see the levels and relative levels of the testing results for the athletes. If someone has high absolute levels of something, we think of as genius or potential cheat; if someone has high relative levels of something but just below the triggering threshold, I would be really suspicious.

Like in the RT, there is a threshold of 0.5. Morozov reacted 0.47 and get disqualified. You may choose to believe he false started or believe he just has a fast reaction. But you need to know that 0.47 to make the decision.

But that’s just my wishful thinking. As shown in Roy’s other comment, WADA does not seem to be happy with change in that direction, and I believe for good reasons. At the end of the day, modern sports are perhaps in the first place business. Those true followers (not sarcastic) are just a tiny population that contribute so little to the business but demand so much from it.

Zhen Sun

Craig,

Sure Craig, that was what I meant. You can only talk about a relative surge, rather than Ning “accelerating between 85-90 to the finish” and McEvoy “was not slowing down much”. It’s just not even common sense.

Craig Lord

All that understood Zhen… some 0.47se/0.50s area part of anti-doping testing… there are levels that trigger ‘yes, worth pursuing’, ‘no, not’… there is also disagreement about what those levels should be. … and in the past when I’ve come across athletes and coaches who know a great deal about such things, they’ve turned out to have wanted to know for all the wrong reasons…

Craig Lord

Yes, we agree Zhen.

Los Feliz

I thought James Magnussen swims in exactly the same fashion when in his top form. That is, his acceleration in the last 15 meters will make him the winner. How do you tell if that is suspicion of doping from the rare quality only a handful of athletes have?

It would be interesting to compare Ning with Magnussen if they swim side-by-side.

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