London 2012 Legacy About More Than Swim Stats: Its Even Sexy In The Serpentine At 1.7C

New London and a pool that has moved on in structure and in the hearts and minds of British swimmers

Editorial: Olympic legacy is about much more than stats that show swimming remains the biggest participation sport in Britain. The events of 2012, highs and lows, played out in the results of the national team in 2014 having moved on in the hearts and minds of those who will seek places on the world-titles team this April at the heart of New London

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Editorial: Olympic legacy is about much more than stats that show swimming remains the biggest participation sport in Britain. The events of 2012, highs and lows, played out in the results of the national team in 2014 having moved on in the hearts and minds of those who will seek places on the world-titles team this April at the heart of New London

Comments

Kat

I popped in for a swim there last night and it continues to be the best pool I’ve ever swum in: plenty of room in the competition pool for public lane swimming (nice and deep to discourage the time-wasters!) and the club kids alongside, lessons and splashing about for the small kids in the training pool, and being able to watch the elite divers training in the distance – all at the same time. I feel very lucky to be able to go there regularly.

Craig Lord

Terrific, Kat, good to hear. Thanks

Mark

It is a complex issue but there are some serious problems relating to our sport which need addressing. Relating them to our town, firstly we have had three new 6 and 8 eight lane pools built to replace aging facilities. All good you say. Yet the competitive swimming club is unable to gain access. They have to train in an old 25yard pool and pay higher rates for the pleasure. The trust has a learn to swim program but there are no links or pathways to the competition side of swimming. The trust has no desire to develop this side of swimming as it is not a money maker, even though the club has offered its services to work with them. After attempts to contact the ASA club development officer resulted in one visit and no follow up, the local club has had to work alone. The local trust do not have the desire to develop swimming beyond learn to swim for obvious money reasons.
If basic pathways and access are a problem, numbers will continue to decline.

Craig Lord

Mark – quite right. I think that is a problem far and wide, not only in Britain but other European countries. It is like life as a traveller on a network that never links up properly, the effort to get from A to B requiring self-funded and energised stops and provisional modes of transport via stages B, C F, G, X and Y. Tragic

James Parrack

Another very good piece and yes, what a fuss indeed! Without wishing to let the truth get in the way of a good story, my recollection was that, in the words of the head of bbc broadcasts from the CG in Auckland, Alastair Scott, commenting on the fact that the interview was broadcast live on bbc breakfast, ‘Some grandmother might be watching this with her breakfast, and choke on her tea hearing language like that.’
The only slaps when I got home were on the back!
How times have changed. I guess orgasms aint what they used to be if anyone can have one just by jumping in a lake.
Thank you for remembering! Great days!

Craig Lord

I can’t claim this has been orgasmic, James, but your insight is much appreciated 🙂

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