Korea To Rethink Double-Whammy Doping Rule In Wake Of Park Tae-hwan Suspension

Park Tae-hwan [Photo: Patrick B. Kraemer]

South Korea’s Olympic Committee said today that it is considering easing its eligibility rules for athletes to make national sports teams. The rethink comes just two days after Park Tae-hwan was banned for 18 months for a positive test in September last year

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South Korea’s Olympic Committee said today that it is considering easing its eligibility rules for athletes to make national sports teams. The rethink comes just two days after Park Tae-hwan was banned for 18 months for a positive test in September last year

Comments

Peter

totally the wrong message sent by Korea’s committee. Creating rules but when a big name is involved, rules have to be eased. Can you be more biassed ? Also the swimmer is always “innocent” it was in the food, they put something in his diet coke, it was done by some unknown doctor, I had a cold, …. .

Commenter

Rules for some and not for others. Punishment may be harsh but what a great message to send to dopers. More countries should adopt the same rules and watch how much more careful ‘innocent’ athletes are and how many more cheats we get rid of.

At the moment the stakes aren’t high enough to deter athletes that have no integrity. When one violation results in a lifetime ban, end of career, then you might take a step closer to seeing the end of doping.

Craig Lord

Commenter – quite so… comes down to resolve and whether you really want to resolve it.

Craig Lord

Peter, indeed – wrong message. This reflects both a sound bite at an airport but reveals one of the problems at the heart of anti-doping: a wavering of intent and weakness of resolve when serious challenge crops up. I do think there is a case under the WADA Code 2015 for Korea to say that such domestic penalties should run concurrent to any international penalty but stretch to the full four years possible allowed in the WADA Code regardless of circumstance. Athletes – the genuinely innocent and the true cheat alike – need to know that their status will not protect them. They need to know that walking into a pharmacy in California and taking the word of a shop assistant far removed form the world of elite sport and anti-doping rules; accepting an injection from a hospital doctor – again, a person with no connection to anti-doping regimes in sport – to give one a boost – should play no part in their world if thy are to escape full consequence in rules and wider public perception.
The provision is actually in the rules under strict liability. There is a clear trend for softer treatment of stablished stars with access to lawyers than the treatment served to swimmers unknown in international waters who are often served full-term penalties.

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