Katsumi Nakamura Returns To Promise With World Cup 48.6 But Lesson Not Yet Learned

Katsumi Nakamura couldn't believe his eyes when he cracked 48.5 earlier this season

Katsumi Nakamura, of Japan, challenged his best-ever over 100m freestyle at the fourth round of the World Cup in Beijing today, his 48.60 victory better than his efforts at the World Championships last month but just shy of his 48.41 high

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Katsumi Nakamura, of Japan, challenged his best-ever over 100m freestyle at the fourth round of the World Cup in Beijing today, his 48.60 victory better than his efforts at the World Championships last month but just shy of his 48.41 high

Comments

aswimfan

Nakamura should ask advice from Ning Zetao on how to swim fast 100….or maybe not

TommyL

Better not… We do not want to see another swimmer with ” * ” next to his name.

Rion is now 10 months away. I wonder whether we will see the 2012-13 Franklin again or not. I cannot wait for the AUS and USA trials. It is going to be a long autumn and winter. At least there is the European SC Championship in 2 months.

aswimfan

No more world records this year..

In the previous years at least we had world Cup in short course which almost inevitably produced a world record or two.

Craig Lord

Maybe at Euro s/c, aswimfan… you never know, what with the delights of mixed relays and all 🙂

TommyL

I am a fan of swimfan but no fan of mixed relays…

Craig Lord

🙂

TommyL

I think Florent could have a good shot at the WR in 100free with enough focus on SC. But as Rio is getting closer I do not think that the big guns will focus on the SC.
And do not forget a is certain lady who likes to do the ironing (aka Ca$$inka).

aswimfan

Mixed relays……. Groans…….

ThereaLuigi

The Bronte sisters went 52 in the 100 free … holy cannoli!

commonwombat

Bronte sisters LOL ! Methinks Cate (C1) would be wishing that upstart little sister (C2) WOULD go find something else to do (like writing Wuthering Heights) rather than always trying to steal “her” show !

Interesting that C2 is now starting to match big sister in her capacity to put out fast times throughout the year; as is also proving the case with Seebohm (another sub59 – 58.59).

TommyL

I am surprised that the Aussie trio are able to get so close to the times they swam in Kazan.

commonwombat

Not really too much of a surprise. Over the past 18-21 months, both C1 & Seebohm have shown the capacity to put out very fast times well outside major competitions or even national titles and over the past year C2 has been tracking in a similar direction.

ThereaLuigi

Campbell sisters of course 🙂

Yozhik

I think that “Ca$$inka” is an old joke already. When I was upset with FINA’s “best swimmer of the year” decision by comparing incomparable world records from Sjostrom and Ledecky with kilo’s of Hosszu’s medals I found “Ca$$inka” joke the most appropriate way to describe the situation. This year I completely changed my opinion. With what was shown this year she deserved respect. I also don’t find anymore her earnings something to be a shame of. At the end nobody finds it strange when professional golfers are ranked by prize money earned.

Craig Lord

Golf – swimming – no comparison, Yozhik… $100,000 prizes should be for world championships not a world cup shunned by the bulk of world-class swimmers and programs for many years, with no reasonable response from the sport’s ‘leaders’. Jordan Spieth $22m, one season, more than the entire world-championship prize money for all swimmers in the past decade combined.

TommyL

Calling KH Ca$$inka was not meant as a joke or disrespect. I am very happy that she was able to bring some serious money home from swimming. It is a pity that majority of the pro swimmers simply do not have a chance to earn some decent money even if they medal at Olympics.
I had to google Jordan Spieth but I do not follow golf…

Yozhik

Craig, you completely misread my comment. The word “professional” in my understanding means the activity that allows someone making living. It is natural then to measure the level of professionalism by earned money. Like with any business the success is measured by profit. If situation with swimming is such that swimmers cannot even afford paying for an equipment and training service then don’t call this activity a professional one. What KH does is an example that something is still possible in this regards. If her example is encouraging or harmful considering current state of money management in international swimming is a subject for absolutely different discussion that I didn’t even touched in my post.

Craig Lord

I disagree, Yozhik: Katie Ledecky earns no money. To describe her as anything less than professional would be absurd. And no fault of KH’s but earning lots of money on a world cup with 80% of the world’s best missing is not the best reflection of a ‘professional’ sport, either.

Yozhik

again Craig it is all a question of definisions. Following your example a professional athlete is a person who spends so much time on sporting activity that he/she does’t have time to do anything else. For me the word profession means ” paid occupation, especially one that involves prolonged training and a formal qualification”
Following this definition Katie Ledecky is amateur schoolgirl being provided by her parents and most likely being claimed as dependant on her parents tax return form. It doesn’t matter how much time she spends training and what kind of meets she competes at.
Also I would appreciate it if in case you don’t understand comments to your article ask question for clarification. Please don’t question the sanity of your responder stating that whatever was said is an absurd. Thank you.

Craig Lord

I didn’t say you were absurd, Yozhik (how could I: I don’t know you, nor you me); I said that the definition is absurd. As far as I’m aware no tennis player, basketball player etc etc have formal qualifications any more than swimmers do, but it would be hard not to call them professional. An author who writes one novel every several years and spends long periods in between writing in thought, travel, feeling the way to the next moment of ‘work’ is also a professional: I don’t think time spent on a specific activity defines professionalism but even if it did, then a swimmer of Ledecky’s quality would surely qualify, taking into account that each meal, each habit in life may be said to contribute to the outcome in the pool. You, too, might refrain from assuming you know my mind – I didn’t misread/misunderstand you – your point was obvious: I just disagree.

Yozhik

Ok, let’s blame this mutual misunderstanding on cultural differences. When I was very young then the foreign word “professional” meant for us something of hieghest quality. When I came to the Western World this word got filled with the different money related meaning. However basically it is still the same – one cannot make living surviving the competition if a high quality product has not been produced.

Craig Lord

I agree, Yozhik (your early understanding of the word remains mine, with the proviso that it can be tainted with bad practice – in realms well beyond sport, too – city, finance, and on and on, etc etc..)… and I never consider you absurd in any of your comments (the idea of an Olympic and world champion in swimming in 2015 being less than ‘professional’ seems absurd to me, that’s all)

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