IOC Presses Plans To Remove Doping Tests From Feds; WADA Powers Set To Grow

Two of the first casualties of the WADA IC report: Lamine Diack, left, and Grigory Rodchenkov

The International Olympic Committee is determined to press ahead with plans to remove anti-doping systems from the control of international federations such as FINA by 2018 in the wake of the Russian doping scandal and other matters raised by the Independent Commission Report commissioned by the World Anti-Doping Agency following the broadcast of ARD documentaries a…

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The International Olympic Committee is determined to press ahead with plans to remove anti-doping systems from the control of international federations such as FINA by 2018 in the wake of the Russian doping scandal and other matters raised by the Independent Commission Report commissioned by the World Anti-Doping Agency following the broadcast of ARD documentaries a… […]

Comments

Lawrie Cox

The recommendations are sound but will they be applied. To date no one in FINA shows interest in ensuring the compliance of the testing. More so when according to the spokesman of FINA don’t persecute a minor positive drug test.
As for the governance reforms FINA is a joke when we had term limits and recently deleted them, IOC age restrictions applied to FINA would go a long way but that is a bit like believing in the jolly fellow with a white beard and red suit, if we think that will occur. Unfortunately the major Federations are still enjoying the tummy tickle so the gravy train continues and the sport continues to go backwards.

aswimfan

I think this is at least is a move in the right direction and I agree with Lawrie it depends on how this is implemented.

Craig Lord

Lawrie, quite right: all will depend on the seriousness of intent not simply to place it all on paper but to enforce it. The IOC and FINA and others all have ethics codes and rules that they break or turn a blind eye to all too often. It is what they do not what they say that will count. The age-term limit call should prompt all leading federations around the world to press the case for good governance at FINA and reverse what was agreed in Kazan: Julio Maglione should not stand for a third term and the man from Kuwait should go back to trying to develop swimming in a country that has no swimming to speak of and certainly no elite swimming of any kind. The tummy tickle indeed – and there is a good deal of self-denial going on: when Rio comes round, swimming will be just as much a once every four years sport as it was in 1992 and, in a different world, much more so than it was in the 1920s. Huge activity beyond the O Games is largely covered only by niche players and widely ignored by the rest of the world. That need not be but it will remain so as long as the current FINA mindset prevails, buoyed by federations that are failing in singular fashion to serve as watchdogs to good practice that would serve their members much better than they are being served right now. Parallel to that is the in-house media and PR machine from IOC downwards that includes so-called independent journalists who, for the most part, are reporting almost none of the bad stuff (and certainly not unearthing it and exposing it for that would mean and end to the free trips and subsidies) at the heart of governance – that has been left to the Andrew Jennings’ of the world, folk who have moved mountains and forced change and in much speedier fashion than decades of nternal patting of backs and diplomacy could ever do.

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