FINA In Hot Water: WADA Expresses Concern Over Handling Of Sun Yang Doping Case

Sun Yang by Patrick B. Kraemer

The World Anti-Doping Agency has issued a thinly veiled criticism of FINA and China’s handling of the Sun Yang doping case, expressing its concern with the lack of communication from “all parties”, while noting that it expects the international swimming federation to take a lead in reinforcing the WADA Code

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The World Anti-Doping Agency has issued a thinly veiled criticism of FINA and China’s handling of the Sun Yang doping case, expressing its concern with the lack of communication from “all parties”, while noting that it expects the international swimming federation to take a lead in reinforcing the WADA Code

Comments

Viva la Bang

I am fed up of this anti Australian crap, We are not responsible for China!, Our coaches most who live on nothing get paid to coach other swimmers, not drug them!

Craig Lord

Viva, I don’t think the serious questions being asked about who breached the WADA Code, how, when and why are among the things we might see (and well we might see some things in that way) as anti-Australian in all of this; what some of the questions highlight is what you’re getting at – one nation is not responsible for another but the boundaries get blurred when doping rules are broken along with trust … and people get into unhelpful tit for tat discussions like those we saw in the Efimova case, the crack between Russia and California deep and wide. Ultimately, if you coach a swimmer and that swimmer tests positive then you have to ask yourself as a coach ‘how come i was not told about all aspects of this swimmer’s health as I set him 10x400s off 4:20 etc etc’; how come I was not told by this swimmer that they’d popped into a local store to get some supplements, etc.,’; if a system paying you lets you down very badly indeed when it comes to transparency over what looks like a very basic doping positive with an explanation to it (whether we accept that or not), then you have to ask yourself ‘should I be working with these people if I am not to be seen as part of the problem?’ Swimming Australia saw that straight away and acted – good for them – but WADA appears to believe that Sun’s coaches, including those he worked with in Australia, should also answer questions. The same would apply in the case of Efimova … and Dave Salo has made his views on supplements well know, though the swimmer remains and the defence of world crowns is likely to follow the mess of it all this year. Much acrimony could and should have been avoided in all these and other cases by the simple application of transparency and truth all round.

John Leonard

Terrific detailed analysis Craig thank you

Clive Rushton

Viva, I don’t see any crap, anti-Australian or otherwise. SAL moved very quickly and showed themselves as a world leader. It now looks like they need to move again to plug a loophole but they are being lauded, not criticized.

Verram

I think Aussie coaches need to see the much wider implications of their own actions beyond the mighty $$$ by helping to train such swimmers… I think part of the reason why they are being chosen by Chinese is because of the perceived success of Aussie swimming in general.. For them to ruin that reputation due to money is not acceptable..

Reader

The Chinese swimmers (including Ye Shiwen) coached by Dennis last few weeks have ended their training and were back to China last week, Sun is still having his training in Australia until March if not mistaken. I wonder if he is training by proxy or “direct” training by Dennis now.

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