Emily Seebohm’s 58.59 Makes It 9 Sub-59 100 Backs This Year, Half Her Career Tally

Emily Seebohm by Patrick B. Kraemer

There’s no stopping the speed of Emily Seeohm, the Australian double backstroke world champion who turned with a second advantage on the rest before roaring home to a 58.59sec victory in the 100m backstroke as the Beijing round of the World Cup drew to a close. Out in 28.75 and back in 29.84, Seebohm, not…

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There’s no stopping the speed of Emily Seeohm, the Australian double backstroke world champion who turned with a second advantage on the rest before roaring home to a 58.59sec victory in the 100m backstroke as the Beijing round of the World Cup drew to a close. Out in 28.75 and back in 29.84, Seebohm, not… […]

Comments

commonwombat

With Seebohm, it appears that her 2014 wins at both CG then PP have proven to be “liberating” mentally. She started this year with sub59 at Super Series in January and hasn’t looked back since.

Much as C1 may be wishing little sister would go find someone else’s “show” to steal; I don’t fancy her chances. It will be interesting to see what they post through the AUS season through to Trials. Barring illness/injury, they would appear to have a lock on the 50 & 100fs individual berths but there’s likely to be a rugby scrum of candidates for the 4x100FS relay berths.

Smith’s performances in these WCup meets have been promising. Whilst it’s likely that he’ll need to drop the best part of a second to grab an individual 200fs spot; the field is open with McEvoy being not entirely convincing in his Kazan 200 outings and McKeonD being …….. well, his customary self in international competition.

aswimfan

I agree, I think the three decisive wins over Franklin (even if she had back injury) at PP was the key in overcoming that mental thing for Seebohm.

Yozhik

I think that Franklin does right things now. That is – forget about her stardom status, swim as many high level races as possible and learn again to be on the top. I am not sure that Seebohm’s prospective at 200m back is that clear. Her “mental thing” is not the only obstacle that she will have to overcome.

aswimfan

Yozhik,

If that’s not clear enough (the article only talked about consistency over 100), I was only talking about 100 when I said about the “mental thing”.
You see, in London Seebohm was the slight favorite going into the final and the loss clearly devastated her and this clearly affected her in 2013 Barcelona. Seebohm has never taken 200 seriously until this year.

At her best, Missy is still the favorite over 200.

Yozhik

Asf, I don’t argue. I am glad that Franklin didn’t get depressed with two years of decline in her elite status in swimming. She actually was in lead at 200 yards mark in both 200m back and 200m free races in Kazan. If she gets this LCM feelings back by including in her preparation program many races despite she may lose all of them then a nice competition between Seebohm and Franklin awaits us in Rio.

commonwombat

After 4 years on the international stage, its fairly clear that Franklin’s optimal distance for both back & freestyle is 200.

I would largely agree that Seebohm is not yet a “fully formed” entity over 200 in that we are still not sure just where her possibilities end. Her 100 has been her optimal distance but she has had some year of swimming 200IM so the distance itself is less the issue but rather what is the optimal pacing.

ASF, re London. Going in, Franklin was the general consensus favourite with Seebohm seen as a medal contender. Seebohm’s heats & semis swims may’ve altered the betting somewhat but it was still probably a marginal call either way. What is clear now is that Seebohm 2015 model is a far more formidable entity than the London vintage.

The backstroke events at AUS trials WILL be interesting viewing. Barring serious illness/injury, Seebohm appears a “lock” for one berth in both 100/200 but the second positions could be very competitive. Wilson’s silver in Kazan 100 certainly makes her a favourite for 2nd 100 but Atherton’s rate of advance could make it interesting and there could be a couple more sub minutes.

The 200 looks very competitive with Baker not making the most of her Kazan outing. Hocking is on the return path and is a 2.06low at best. Wilson messed up in the final at AUS Trials and may have a significant “drop” in times as could Atherton.

aswimfan

Roy,

I would argue that Mitch Larkin also has similar range to Seebohm. And unlike Seebohm, Larkin is fairly new in elite world level water.

commonwombat

ASF, Larkin has actually been in international competition since 2011; its just that he didn’t “hit his straps”/fully mature until 2014. It was certainly a case of “sending a boy out against men” for his first few years.

Whilst the AUS female backstroke ranks have depth, the same cannot be said for the men. Looking beyond Larkin and its a tad problematic to find a 2nd qualifier in the 100. Delaney has been a “lost sheep” since 2009. Treffers is essentially a 50 man who struggles to go the full distance over 100.

Beaver and perhaps Lawson could make the 200 QT but there’s reasonable doubt about their current capacity to make the drop to the 1.55low/1.54 that will be needed to make the final.

commonwombat

Next stop is Singapore over the weekend with both Campbells, Seebohm, Hosszu, VDB & Franklin all down to compete.

aswimfan

Roy,

Here’s comparison of Xu JIayu and Larkin’s results in Kazan:

50:
Larkin 4th, Jiayu 29th
100:
Larkin 1st, Jiayu 4th
200:
Larkin 1st, Jiayu 6th

So I truly do not understand why you are saying Larkin does not have the range as great as Jiayu. Bias, much?

aswimfan

Jiayu’s 24.65 is actually the exact same time Larkin swam in Kazan.

And Larkin has significantly faster PBs in 100 and 200 than Jiayu.

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