Days Of Doping Darkness Return To Haunt Russia

GDR, state plan 14:25: victims of abuse included young athletes used as guinea pigs

A day after news that an old steroid dating back to the 1980s, stanozolol, had been administered to an Estonian teenage swimmer, Russian swimmer Nikita Maksimov has been banned for two years after testing positive for the anabolic steroid at the core of East Germany’s State Plan 14:25 systematic doping programme of the 1970s and 1980s, Oral-Turinabol; we know the swimmer’s name – but who else is responsible?

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A day after news that an old steroid dating back to the 1980s, stanozolol, had been administered to an Estonian teenage swimmer, Russian swimmer Nikita Maksimov has been banned for two years after testing positive for the anabolic steroid at the core of East Germany’s State Plan 14:25 systematic doping programme of the 1970s and 1980s, Oral-Turinabol; we know the swimmer’s name – but who else is responsible?

Comments

Cayley Guimarães

Excellent question: who are the folks in shadows!?

SwimFanFinland

Thanks for a well-written piece! The conversation about doping should be directed more at those in shadows. Athletes are mercilessly attacked by us but criminals behind the curtain just keep going. Maybe the failure to discover and prosecute coaches, doctors and other personnel in connection with systematic doping malpractices could also result in the suspension of a whole national federation. The doctrine of joint criminal enterprise applied by the International Criminal Tribunals to the commanders could be applied to the cases of flawed sporting regimes, extending to the minister of sport if necessary. This case of a 14-year girl is outrageous. Who really believes she’s wanted deliberately improve her performances by resorting in the help of prohibited substances. Cheating comes in on the picture when you know you cannot achieve your goals by training. This youngster didn’t know it yet.

beachmouse

Those that are fans of track & field/athletics know that the Russians and a few of the other former Soviet republics like Belarus have an utterly abysmal doping record in recent years. It’s at the point where female Russian runners and throwers have a default assumption that they’re doping any time they turn in really excellent domestic results.

It’s not unexpected to see that seem to bleed over into other Russian sports but it is sad because the Russian programs had seemed to be making such good clean progress in recent years and it was going to be more hard work and improved coaching that would take them to the top tier of programs; they didn’t need the short cut of artificial enhancements.

beachmouse

Daily Mail (UK tabloid) is reporting today that the head of Russian anti-doping has been arrested for criminal sales of doping products, and there are reports that their labs have been covering up positive tests. I’m guessing you can’t link here for spam reduction reasons, but searching for news stories with “Grigory Rodchenkov” will bring it up. And in other track doping news, an anti-doping investigation of Turkish athletes has returned so many positive tests in a relatively small athlete pools that the rumor mill says the federation is facing a SMU-style ‘death penalty’ for a period of time.

Lane Four

Dr. Kipke “got away with murder”.
Secondly, WHY would anyone take such terrible chances with their athletic future AND their health? Just take a long look at Rica Reinisch, the 1980 triple Olympic champion from the DDR. World record holder at 15. Olympic champion at 15. And then GONE because of the drugs administered to her. These drugs are as deadly as any poison. Not acceptable! NOT ACCEPTABLE!

Craig Lord

Have caught up with the Sunday paper version and read the response on Russian wires today – quote:
The head of Russia’s athletics federation on Monday claimed accusations that doping is widespread in Russian track and field are part of a conspiracy to wreck next month’s world championships in Moscow.
Over the weekend, British tabloid newspaper the Mail on Sunday published a special investigation claiming that Russian athletes were pressured to dope and that the head of the national drug test laboratory in Moscow had faced criminal charges related to the supply of banned substances.
“I think that the publication’s goal is explained at the end of the text – the world championships in Moscow,” Russia’s athletics federation president Valentin Balakhnichev said. “The author, with a great understanding of the importance of this competition, has decided to spoil the beginning of it, to spoil guests’ opinions about the country.”
Balakhnichev conceded that some of the allegations deserve further scrutiny. “I don’t yet understand how to react to it. Either it’s a provocation or it really is something serious,” he said.

brian

ah yes the bad old days:

today:
http://www.news.com.au/breaking-news/sprint-stars-asafa-powell-and-tyson-gay-are-drug-cheats-so-is-anyone-running-clean/story-e6frfkp9-1226679534118

yesterday

1988 Seoul Olympics[edit]
A famous case of illicit AAS use in a competition was Canadian Ben Johnson’s victory in the 100 m at the 1988 Summer Olympics. He subsequently failed the drug test when stanozolol was found in his urine. He later admitted to using the steroid as well as Dianabol, testosterone, Furazabol, and human growth hormone amongst other things. Johnson was therefore stripped of his gold medal as well as recognition of what had been a world-record performance. Carl Lewis was then promoted one place to take the Olympic gold title. Lewis had also run under the current world record time and was therefore recognized as the new record holder. In 2003, however, Dr. Wade Exum, the United States Olympic Committee (USOC) director of drug control administration from 1991 to 2000, gave copies of documents to Sports Illustrated which revealed that some 100 American athletes who failed drug tests and should have been prevented from competing in the Olympics were nevertheless cleared to compete. Among those athletes was Carl Lewis. Lewis then broke his silence on allegations that he was the beneficiary of a drugs cover-up, admitting he had tested positive for banned substances but claiming he was just one of “hundreds” of American athletes who were allowed to escape bans, concealed by the USOC. Lewis has now acknowledged that he failed three tests during the 1988 US Olympic trials, which under international rules at the time should have prevented him from competing in the Seoul games two months later.[30]
Former athletes and officials came out against the USOC cover-up. “For so many years I lived it. I knew this was going on, but there’s absolutely nothing you can do as an athlete. You have to believe governing bodies are doing what they are supposed to do. And it is obvious they did not,” said former American sprinter and 1984 Olympic champion, Evelyn Ashford.[31]
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Doping_in_sport

use of drugs in sport was pioneered in the US

Craig Lord

GDR was testing European athletes from a variety of nations in the 1960s in preparation for State Plan 14:25. That was way before all the 1980s stuff. The “pioneers” of doping came from several nations but the development of systematic approach, with humans used as guineas pigs before substances were given to athletes streamlined for the medals factory was definitely “Made in the GDR”.

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