Charlotte Sprint Titles To Arianna Vanderpool-Wallace & Josh Schneider

prepares herself before competing in the women's 50m Freestyle Heats during the Swimming competition held at the Aquatics Center during the London 2012 Olympic Games in London, Great Britain, Friday, Aug. 3, 2012. (Photo by Patrick B. Kraemer / MAGICPBK)
Arianna Vanderpool-Wallace of Bahamas by Patrick B. Kraemer

A fast night of action at the Charlotte stop on the USA Swimming Pro Series circuit was headlined by victories from Arianna Vanderpool-Wallace and Josh Schneider in the 50 freestyle.

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A fast night of action at the Charlotte stop on the USA Swimming Pro Series circuit was headlined by victories from Arianna Vanderpool-Wallace and Josh Schneider in the 50 freestyle.

Comments

felixdangerpants

Outstanding weekend by Wallace just haven’t seen anything from her on the international stage yet (lc)….Vyatchanin, has he ever lived in Serbia? I find it bizarre how someone can gain citizenship in a country they’ve never lived, worked etc in….

Bad Anon

Great meet overall from SwimMac athletes. Marsh magic at play.

aswimfan

Judging from the fast times registered by AVW, Lochte, Coventry and other SwimMAC swimmers, it does seem they are at least rested for this home town meet.
And yes, Marsh is just a great coach.

Overall, the times are faster than last year owing to the fact that this year is Worlds year maybe.

Haakon

At the risk of repeating previous discussions yet another time: is nobody out there of the opinion that Lochte and Phelps already have seen their best times and that Rio might prove to be a big disappointment for both as well as US Swimming? Yes, it is still early in the season, and yes, both are on a recovery plan from injury/retirement, and both have proven time and time again that they deliver at the end of the day. Lochte apparently spent the best part of the post-London year on filming and PR, yet managed to deliver well at Worlds, maybe thanks to a lot of historic yardage in the bank? He subsequently left Coach Troy in Florida for Coach Marsh of SwimMac. I am sure they are working quite hard at SwimMac, but I have not gotten the impression that they do the type of grueling, long work that Coach Troy demands of his swimmers at the U of Florida? Of course people reach some point where a change of environment can be needed to continue to improve, but this can also be seen as a sign of someone no longer being willing to subject oneself to the incredibly tough work that Coach Troy apparently demands? Phelps is the most winning Olympian of all time, an incredibly athlete. Yet London was less than flawless. He lost the 200 fly, and almost lost the 100 as well to le Clos. He got maybe a little lucky with Lochte having his 200 back race immediately prior to the 200 IM? Lochte was obviously quite drained after that excruciating 200 back race. Apparently doing 5 times a week work outs in 2014 coupled with various extracurricular activities may not be enough to come out on top in Rio when the competition is doing 12 a week, is continually improving, is in its early 20s, and is hungry. A little more than a year of tough Bowman regime may not be enough, and also keep in mind that a 30 year old Phelps will probably not respond to that type of work in the same way the 18 or 22 year old Phelps did. More rest is probably required between each hard day. On a general note, both Phelps and Lochte, as well as the Americans in general, have dominant with regards to underwater work on the international scene at least during the past 10 years. From what I believe I have seen lately that advantage seems to have been lost lately on account of the competition catching up, cf Hagino blowing Lochte away during their last 200 IM outing. Yet another indication that two of the finest swimmers ever might find 2016 a challenging year. Are the heroes tired?

felixdangerpants

Roy you talk so much rubbish

Craig Lord

Your last question Haakon is one that can only be answered by the moment. What we have to lean on tells us:
1. Lochte and Phelps have stood up many more times than not when it counted and beyond this point…
2. USA Swimming – not the daft blazers, the champions and coaches at the coal-face – will not fail at the Olympic Games – I see plenty of green shoots poised for spring and a summer new
3… which means that, back to 1, the likes of Lochte and Phelps will need to stack up at home, and if they do, come peak season 2016, they will be in with a shot at another successful moment
4. Lochte has said he will return to Troy on the way to Rio: we must wait to see if that happens.
5. Phelps – his goals are not yet clear

aswimfan

Roy may even think that Franklin’s tall height is of no help.
🙂

aswimfan

Roy,

Because Yamaguchi is a good swimmer and Japanese swimmers usually have great stroke technique?
Just imagine a taller Yamaguchi with great streamline…. The WR would have gone even lower.

aswimfan

Haakon,

Not sure about anybody else, but I do think Phelps and Lochte’s best times are past them.
But this does not mean either will fail to go to Rio, being true champions that they are.

Phelps is obviously fueled by desire to be the first to four-peat. (In 2010 and 2011 was ridiculed many times in other swimming sites when I had predicted that Phelps would swim 400 IM in London for the reason that I thought Phelps wanted to have as many chance to threepeat as possible despite Phelps himself publicly swore to never swim 400 IM again, and again I was ridiculed in 2012 when I declared that Phelps would unretire despite he publicly announced his retirement). With lighter schedule, I can see Phelps makes the team in 100 fly and the relays.

With Lochte, his best bet is 200 IM and 4×200. He might just make the team in those events.
As for winning Rio individual golds, I think the chances are not great for both.

Danjohnrob

@Haakon: It depends on what you consider a big disappointment, I guess!

IMO the US is lucky that Phelps decided to continue his career for several reasons:

1. Relays – MP adds depth in the 4×100/200 Free Relays that few countries can boast about. He also is the only current swimmer who has swum a flat-start 50+ 100 fly. He and Bowman know what it takes to get to that time better than anybody, and while a few people may join him in the 50+ club by Rio, I haven’t seen signs they’ll be from countries that can challenge the US in the 4×100 Medley.

2. Publicity: Where Phelps goes, so goes the media, and we want them there to witness the new generation of US talent. Also, media = $ in the US, and what national swim team doesn’t need that?

3. Medals: I personally believe Phelps has a good shot at gold in the 100 fly and possibly the 200 IM as well, you may not, but even if he misses gold you have to admit he has an even better chance of winning minor medals to boost US totals.

Lochte is not quite as helpful to the US in relays, but he is one of the reasons the US has dominated the 4×200 Free Relay for so long. His switch to Swim MAC/Marsh definitely means less yardage, but he has gone there to learn how he can improve his sprint free times, and I think if he makes the US 4×100 Team in Rio and performs better than he did in London, Lochte will consider his team switch successful. I also wouldn’t count out Ryan for a medal in the 200 IM based on his track record.

Will MP or RL break any more records or win individual gold? Only time will tell, but if they help the US bump up one step on each of the men’s relays relative to where we might have fallen without them, bring media attention and add 3 individual medals while providing leadership to the youth of our Team, I’d call their performance a success, not a disappointment, but you’re entitled to your opinion.

aswimfan

Roy,

I agree that tall height is more of an asset in freestyle than in other strokes, but I also think that being tall is still a benefit in the strokes as well.

As for breaststroke, it is more complicated because it’s more technical as well as require greater flexibility.

Haakon

aswimfan / Danjohnrob,

First of all, thank you for many interesting as well as insightful comments on this site during the past years. Second, it would seem I have misinterpreted the general expectations of Messrs Phelps / Lochte in Rio; your comments regarding this are much more subdued than I perceived was the general thinking. So basically we agree on what might unfold come next summer for these great athletes. And no arguing in that they both are important for the general interest in swimming and that they should provide great leadership for the US team next year – you are so right.

On the issue of who may crack 51 in the 100 fly next year, I am quite certain you will see a South African do so with flying colours, provided of course, that he limits his checking out the competition to no more than four 180 degrees swipes of the pool … By lowering the head position when breathing to what most coaches advocate, we might even see a sub 50 (-:

Craig Lord

Haakon, I make few predictions but I say this: we won’t see a sub-50 in that time frame (and it’ll take more than a tweak to the head position when it happens)

aswimfan

Reece Whiteley is a great talent.. It’s a good thing he is not lost to basketball like so many tall kids were before…

I don’t think I am familiar with Matthew Wilson, can you please tell me more about him

Danjohnrob

@Haakon: If you have any way of communicating with Mr Le Clos, PLEASE ask him to keep his eyes on his own lane! Ugh! He should have swum under 51 already! He’s also setting a bad example for young swimmers by turning his head to look at his competitors, if you ask me, but it’s none of my business.

Thanks for your reply! I’m not giving up on Phelps, by the way, but as easy as he’s made it look during these last 3 Olympic Games, it’s not easy winning gold medals, and the competition around the world is just getting tougher!

Bad Anon

Phelps struggling to make finals at Charlotte proswim, he is not doing well at the moment

beachmouse

The usual rule of thumb with American Grand Prix/Pro Series meets is to note the good results and ignore the bad ones. The USAS National Team contract typically says that you have to show up for 2-3 of those meets a year, generally to help promote the sport at a high level, not that you have to direct your training plan to try to win at those meets.

Historically, Ryan Lochte will cheerfully swim a whole bunch of B & C finals because he doesn’t want the meet to disrupt a heavy training block, spend a couple hours signing autographs for kids after a session and call it a successful weekend. And then a few months later go pick up a few Olympic or World titles. Phelps likely has his road to Rio training plan mapped out in the same way. He’s supposedly doing more than twice the number of training sessions in a week than he was this time last year.

Bad Anon

Relatively speaking, not literally

aswimfan

I am a huge fan of Lochte just for the fact that he loves to hang out with his fans. His spartan warrior attitude and winning styles help too 🙂

Dave

Two points here:
1. It’s almost impossible to extrapolate performances in the meet to performances in Kazan as some of you asre trying to do here. These are in season PR-driven events as others have pointed out. For example, Schneider was (partially) rested at this meet while Adrian wasn’t. Schneider might not go much faster, Adrian almost certain will go a lot faster.
2. Let’s not get too far ahead of ourselves. Tons of US talent bubbling just under the surface for Rio. Weitzel, Seliskar, Conger, Baker, Haas, Eastin, Dressel etc. Pan-Ams is going to be a very fast meet.

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