Adam Peaty Says ‘You Won’t See Me For A While’: Up at 4am In Bed By 7pm, Rio Rising

Adam Peaty - by Gian Mattia D'Alberto / lapresse

“People won’t see me for a while now because I’ll be so tired, but that’s what it’s going to take – and I’m greeting it with open arms” – Adam Peaty, in bed every evening at 7pm, up and about at 4am for training throughout Olympic season to stay in tune with night swimming at Rio 2016

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“People won’t see me for a while now because I’ll be so tired, but that’s what it’s going to take – and I’m greeting it with open arms” – Adam Peaty, in bed every evening at 7pm, up and about at 4am for training throughout Olympic season to stay in tune with night swimming at Rio 2016

Comments

TommyL

I am confused. In Rio the heats are scheduled at 1pm and finals at 10pm. What is the point the have a training session at 4am? He will arrive in Rio at least 10days in advance so by the time the swimming starts he should be adjusted to the Rio time. I would expect him to have a training session around noon/1pm, have some rest and another session starting at 9-10pm.

@ Craig,
could you please share your view on this? Imagine you have a group of 3-4 Olympic swimmers and you want to have a 3 weeks camp with them in order to prepare for the Rio time schedule.

Many thanks.

Craig Lord

TommyL, it’s not just about circadian rhythms … it is about habit, confidence, removing anything, doubt included, that could get in the way of being the best you can be at a specific one moment on one v big day in a sporting life. Not quite 4am but many squads across Britain are in the water very early because the bulk of squads are made up of young kids who need to get two hours in before they have breakfast and get to school. The schedule you suggest: impossible in most situations in Britain, pools being an asset that is not, in the vast majority of cases, owned by elite sport.
More thought (sorry for delayed response, was on the move and not in a position to finish my comment earlier…): it isnt in the scope of my expertise to give advice to a squad preparing on this side of the world for what will happen at a strange time of day on the other side of the world next July… but there are experts advising squads to at least test, on several occasions, what it feels like to live at a different time of day and daylight to normal … in Rio, twilight in July is before 6pm, so 10pm finals will mean swimmers travelling from hotels to warm-up in the dark – perhaps they will need to move fast and keep the lights on in the bus and all the way to the pool deck just to make sure they don’t nod off 🙂 … on a serious note, light therapy is tried, tested and sworn by in the sporting and business realms, studies galore and products marketed accordingly, as we’re all aware.
Beyond making sure a swimmer has felt what it feels like to switch time zones, get used to it, adapt, do the things that help you to adapt, like use of bright lights when you need to be up and total darkness when you don’t, no matter how awake you feel at a particular moment, I’m not aware of any studies that point to any advantage in holding short-term, infrequent camp-like activity aimed at replicating what has to happen for 3 weeks or so in Rio next year.
In terms of what Adam Peaty and his sched (I have no idea on a scientific level) there may be some benefit to be had in spending a year making sure you’re wide awake every day at the time (on the 24-hr clock on the other side of the world) when finals are underway next year (please keep in mind that I am not aware of the precise reasoning and argument and any science behind the hours he’s going to keep – and won’t be until there’s a chance to speak to him, Mel Marshall etc, down the road sometime when).
Beyond that, I’m not sure that we can relate the time of heats and finals to the scenario in that, looking at a whole range of training programs of top swimmers down the years, test sets can and are often done mornings at race pace …and in Australia of late the test the swimmers did was to race hard around lunchtime, and harder at the midnight hour.
On Adam Peaty and any in northern Europe, what training early does do is place you in a very light ambience for much longer in the day at a time of year when there may be less than 8 hours natural daylight. And it means you cut out long hours spent staring at the dark outside the window if you’re in bed by 7pm 🙂 Sorry I can’t be more helpful than that … when the chance arises, I’ll take a proper look at the issues with some expert opinion …

Eugene

OMG! 4AM — 7PM is much sicker schedule than what Australians and some others do now with training at midnight. Can’t even imagine how he maintains it.

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