Adam Peaty 59.5 Tops World Ranks; Ranomi Goes 53.3; Ben Proud On 21.77 In Edinburgh

Adam Peaty, Britain's double World breaststroke champion - by Pentaphoto for Arena
Adam Peaty, Britain's double World breaststroke champion - by Pentaphoto for Arena

Double World champion Adam Peaty sped to the helm of the 100m breaststroke world rankings with a dominant 59.55 victory on the second day of action at the Edinburgh International; Ben Proud on 21.81 and 21.77 in the 50m free; and Chris Walker-Hebburn goes 25.66 in the backstroke dash

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Personal Best

While the women’s 100 free may well see the top three all under 53 seconds at the Olympics, nothing’s a certainty and Kromowidjojo certainly is very competitive.

I wasn’t sure what she’d be capable of, but she could well get close to dipping below 53.
I believe she’s done it once (twice?) in textile.

aswimfan

She went sub 53 once, 52.75 in early 2012 (eindhoven cup)

Yozhik

The list of top sprinters at W100 freestyle is getting familiar shape. It is still missing Heemskerk and because of that it is hard to say what she is thinking about and what she is focusing at. There are some changes at the second echelon. We don’t see yet two Aussies (Write and Elmslie) and American traditional duet (Franklinn, Manuel) has been replaced with another one (Ledecky, Weitzeil). These two American girls showed personal bests but their style at 100 is far from traditional. So it is hard to say if it is the end of the road or it is just a beginning of something spectacular. I haven’t found much written about Weitzeil’s prospects. But when Ledecky says at interview about her plans at 100 I take it seriously -“So I’m going to do everything I can do to get faster than I was in Austin, hopefully a lot faster, and we’ll see where that takes me.” Similar thing was said by Gemmell after 200m final in Kazan and see where it took us just a few months later – 1:54.43

beachmouse

Weitzel has been brilliant in the short course yards pool, but it’s taken a bit longer for the excellent results in the big girl pool to follow. As an American, I’ve been excited to see that it looks like she’s getting closer to hr short course beilliance.

Yozhik

As it has been already discussed her 53.77 (25.18, 28.59) can mean potentials for brilliance or dead end or just intermediate step in transition from SC to LC.
BTW the swimvortex’s ranking list makes her one year older. She just turned 19.

Craig Lord

Dec 3 entered in database – she is 19 once more, Yozhik (we refresh specific DOBs each season for all who make the biggest intl meets … and a few more… in many cases they’re there…just a case of ticking a box 🙂 Thanks for alert

Personal Best

That’s right ASF – thanks.
I remember that – on her way to the Olympic crown.
Such a competitive time.

As for the Aussie girls – I think Elmslie will have the edge over Wright – worrying that Wright may have an injury.

The Dutch still have a few big guns – but a real shame (personally) about Dekker.

As for Ledecky – I think most know not to write her off. Same with Franklin. The US team is only getting stronger.

Yozhik

@Craig. Thanks for the correction and for providing age information in the ranking list. It helps. For instance, one can easily observe that average age of first ten swimmers in the list is 20.5. The following ten average 25.3
It looks like age matters, or older swimmers are wiser and don’t rush in with fast in-season times 🙂

Craig Lord

Yes, one way or another, Yozhik, age does matter 🙂

Yozhik

@Personal Best. If three members of USA women freestyle relay team are at least not slower than McKeon Emma then the winner of the relay race will be the team that makes exchanges better. Is it doable? Let’s see in a few weeks at trials if 53.48 of Emma’s current speed will be the time to beat. Can three American 19 years old youngsters be up to this challenge. I want to believe that the answer is ‘ yes’.
P.S. Craig, I’m sorry. I don’t do it for purpose 🙂 Just happened to notice that Manuel is still 19.

Craig Lord

Thanks Yozhik, glad to get those spots. She’s 19 now 🙂

Yozhik

One more thing ( as lieutenant Columbo likes to say) I checked NSW Championships AUS, Sydney w100 freestyle (prelims and finals) and didn’t find Madison Wilson 54.25 But do see Bronte Barratt 54.39.

Craig Lord

Thanks Yozhik – full meet not checked for live yet… Barratt’s swim now live… Wilson’s a split from the 200m free, a time trial (so it counts, as intended).

Yozhik

Thank you, Craig. I’m preoccupied now with w4x100 freestyle relay. That’s why I’m paying attention to details of w100 fs rankings. I’m glad to be helpful.

Yozhik

My first reaction on Wilson’s 54.25 was ‘Wow!’. If she does it as split at 200 race then Australian team has another 53 sec sprinter. But when I checked the splits everything get back to their places. It was 100 race (2:18.40 54.25-1:24.15) with unbelievable reaction time – 0.34 sec.

Yozhik

I think that Wilson’s race has to be disqualified. In my opinion it is impossible to react to the start signal that fast and to leave blocks that quick. She definitely began to move before signal. If zero reaction time is ok at relay start then at individual race it should be some reasonable threshold grater than 0.

aswimfan

Yozhik,

Kiah Melverton also had RT of 0.34 in the 200 free prelims, likewise Bronte Barratt had RT of 0.45 in that 200 free prelims as well.

Either they got lucky and judged/timed their perfectly or there’s a bit of error in the starting block.

There have been prominent examples of RT amazing:
Inge Debruijn broke 50 free WR in 2000 Sydney with RT of 0.41
Amy Van Dyken also had RT of 0.41 in the 50 free prelms in Sydney.
Rowdy Gaines who had become familiar with the starter in 1984 Olympics, made an almost too good to be true perfect start in 1984 Los Angeles 100 free final and won, causing protest from Mark Stockwell (husband of Tracy Caulkins now) that Gaines false started.

So are you saying that Inge De Bruijn, Amy Van Dyken, Rowdy Gaines all need to return their olympics medals?

Yozhik

Asf, I don’t know exact rule but expect them to have swimmer to stand still before start signal. There was a time when the correctness of start was decided not by devices but by visual observation of officials. The RT of 0.55-0.6 sec is considered exceptional like in case with Meilutyte. Therefore I thought that RT of 0.34 sec is physically impossible unless a swimmer begins to move before the start signal.
The rule may different now and entirely relies on electronic detection of the moment the swimmer leaves blocks. But what if the pool is not equipped with such devices? Can it be used for run official meets?

Yozhik

Asf, the answer to your question is very simple. If mentioned swimmers have broken rules of making start then they have to return medals. But as I said I am not sure that if it was the case. I thought you could help me with that. Did they false started?

Craig Lord

Yozhik, the relevant rules: SW 4.1 to 4.4. Starting signal shall only be given once all swimmers are ‘stationary’. 3 things to know, in essence not verbatim:

1. if the start is an obvious leap ahead of the signal; race recalled and the swimmer in question is asked to sit out
2. if one swimmer appears to get away fast but is perceived to do so after the signal was given, then the race continues – and the electronic reaction time decides whether here was a false start.
3. if the starter can see that an early start was caused by their own equipment failure/mistake etc, he can recall the race, no one gets DQd and the race is started again.

also relevant is SW 2.3.2 – delaying the start, “wilfully disobeying an order” or for “any other misconduct taking place at the start”, the starter can ask a swimmer to step down, a DQ declared.

The starter has the power to decide if a start is “fair”, subject only to the decision of the referee. So, yes, it would be the starter who gives the nod on a DQ if he feels that someone reacting at 0.3, say. had moved before the starting signal was heard.

Yozhik

Isn’t it weird to measure the time at the finish electronically with the accuracy of 0.01 second and at the same time allowing the uncertainty of the start moment to be up to 0.7 second (average rt). It is a good idea to befriend with starter and referee. It can be a golden friendship. It is even up to them to use or not the video-tape timing system (FR 4.7.3) when it is available, to verify the disqualification.
I’m probably missing something.

aswimfan

Yozhik,

I think the likeliest explanation is that there were some electronic error, in the starting block circuit, or the liveresults software, because the starter did not DQ the swimmers and I don’t believe that the two swimmers (Kiah Melverton and Bronte Barratt) would have tried to get that much from the start in a 200 free race, in prelims, in a local meet. Likewise with Wilson in the final.

50 free sprint in the Olympics, now it’s a different matter together.

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