Evgeny Rylov Revs To 53.17 100m Back Crown; Daria Ustinova 2:07.2 World Junior Mark

Evgeny Rylov, courtesy of Arena

Russia has been in search of a 100m backstroke speedster since the swim federation fell out with Arkady Vyatchanin, now racing for Serbia. Green shoots were to be found in the shape of a 53.17 victory for 18-year-old Evgeny Rylov at the helm of the 100m backstroke final on day two at Russian Swimming Championships in Moscow; Daria Ustinova on 2:07 world junior record in 200m backstroke; Vladimir Morozov on 48.36 in 100m free

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Russia has been in search of a 100m backstroke speedster since the swim federation fell out with Arkady Vyatchanin, now racing for Serbia. Green shoots were to be found in the shape of a 53.17 victory for 18-year-old Evgeny Rylov at the helm of the 100m backstroke final on day two at Russian Swimming Championships in Moscow; Daria Ustinova on 2:07 world junior record in 200m backstroke; Vladimir Morozov on 48.36 in 100m free

Comments

Bad Anon

How fast was Missy at 16? If Ustinova drops more time she’ll be a threat for gold in Rio

Craig Lord

2:05.10, Badanon

JOSE

I believe that the men 100 meter Free was the semifinal. The final is Tomorrow. Maybe we will see faster times by those guys. Also I believe that Natalia Lovtsova the 100 free winner came from suspension from doping.

Craig Lord

Thanks Jose… semis it was indeed 🙂 … Lovtsova doping details now in the article

MP

My gut feeling tells me that we shall see quite a few “outstanding” swims by Russian swimmers in Kazan.

Bad Anon

I agree with you MP. The men’s 400free relay will be gold medal contendors

benny goodman

How can any person believe the integrity of the Russians in any sport, especially Track and field and Swimming.They are doped more than any other country; its in their DNA.

MP

Benny – Agree with you. But you are not American, by any chance, are you? Armstrong, Hamilton, Landis, Montgomery, Gay, Gatlin, Merritt, Jones, Hardy and countless more in sports that only they play (Baseball, NFL etc). What Armstrong has done equals to 20 million other cases of doping put together. Only my humble and personal opinion.

Bad Anon

USADA does a good job in busting cheats. Other authorities go to great lengths to cover up cases which is very shameful

felixdangerpants

Benny I am with you, how can any Russian times be trusted but MP is correct……there are cheats everywhere. Bad anon how do you know they do a good job? There are far more who dont get caught then do…..

beachmouse

You’re going to find cheats everywhere when the money gets good enough, I’m say to say. But it takes a special kind of chuztpah for the federation itself to systematically get involved in the business of cheating.

And Russian sport is more than willing to bend the rule of time and space when it comes to suspensions. “Oops, we revised her ban down to 2 years from 2.5” is actually pretty straightforward compared to the Russian time travel race walking meet that is likely to get Elena Lashmanova’s doping ban clock reset to zero.

I offer up what passes for Russian sporting integrity these days:

http://www.athleticsweekly.com/featured/iaaf-investigating-allegations-elena-lashmanova-competed-banned-15710/

Viva la Bang

The Russians are coming just like the Chinese and East Germans, watch out!

Chris

MP

I think that Jessica Hardy was a victim of unintentional doping from supplements so a bit unfair to include her with that motley crew.

Also its ridiculous to as I say before that one county dopes and one does not. It is the individual athlete who chooses to dope. If the athlete takes drugs in Russia they are caught and punished and that is the same for all other countries USA, UK, Australia whatever. To say that doping is in the DNA of a country is a daft statement to make.

Craig Lord

I think country is too general because it ropes in many innocent folk way beyond the bounds of sport (in which there will be many clean athletes, too) and politics, Chris, yes … but there would clearly appear to be a cultural problem within the sports sphere and top down in the political realm (as noted by beachmouse and to be found far and wide in other publications):
http://www.athleticsweekly.com/featured/iaaf-investigating-allegations-elena-lashmanova-competed-banned-15710/
http://www.athleticsweekly.com/featured/russia-accused-systematic-doping-corruption-cover-ups-14313/
The latter tale at source including a statement from the German TV company that its lawyers have that document with a government decree (with VP’s name on it, that chap who got FINA’s top honour for ‘services to swimming’ …) calling for activity that would interfere with the chain of command on anti-doping samples. WADA investigating but if that and the other allegations are proven, then we would not be talking about an athlete here or there deciding for themselves to dope… it would be more serious, deeper, wider, than that.

Craig Lord

MP, important to note that Jessica Hardy’s case was reviewed and a ruling made/conclusion taken that she had ingested a banned substance without any way of knowing that the product she did know she was consuming contained an ingredient that was not on the tin, so to speak.

Chris

I have heard about the Lashmanova case in race walking and clearly there are problems in a county which lets face it is not a free society.
I happen to think that the World Champs should have been taken from Kazan because of the number of cases involved and that FINA should have made a stand on this. But they have not which seems to be their way.
I think your right to highlight drug problems in swimming and I have no problem that you naming people who have cheated.

Chris

Thanks Craig for the ruling on the Jessica Hardy case. I do think that in many cases the doping is unintentional and as nearly every sportsperson takes supplements that can ruin a career of a genuine clean athlete.

beachmouse

And USA Swimming was willing to give Hardy a fairly long suspension (far longer than Cielo and that Brazilian lot for a similar positive test) in a situation where they also screwed up their 2008 Olympic selection process because the positive came to light literally the day after their internal selection deadline to add new athletes to the team, meaning the Lara Jackson and Tara Kirk, who had been 3rd in their events at Trials, got passed over in favor of slower athletes on the squad in other events who also had an A qualifier in the 100 breast and 50 free. (I think Amanda Weir also lost a relay spot that would have rolled down to her a day earlier.)

aswimfan

This is ominous sign that some Russian swimmers will drop some jaw-dropping times in Kazan…yes Efimova I’m looking at you

Commenter

Russia is a stain on international sport integrity. Plain and simple. They should not be able to compete let alone host a world championship.

Danjohnrob

Will Vyatchanin be able to compete for Serbia in Kazan? Well, the next time he’s allowed to line up behind the blocks against Rylov or whoever Russia’s top backstroker is, I’d bet good money that we’ll see either his guts in the water or his hand touch the wall first! 😉

Dan

FINA hasn’t helped by awarding the World Champs to Russia. The Russian state machine will want to win lots of medals to demonstrate their strength and therefore lots of carrots and sticks will have been thrown to the Russian swimming federation and no doubt to individual coaches to achieve results.
Given their record on doping I’m just as worried about the Brazillians next year. It’s the clean athletes who lose out on medals that I feel sorry for.

Sean

Rylov was disqualified at last years European junior champs on the 200 Bk for “glueing” his feet!

Danjohnrob

LOL! I’ve never heard of that! But with the new backstroke wedges it shouldn’t be necessary anyway. That’s very thorough officiating! Who is checking backstrokers’ feet to see if they’re sticky at meets?

aswimfan

Maybe the officials were targeting/profiling the Russians as the prime suspects?
Just like what the Japanese did to the Chinese in 1994 Hiroshima and the Australians did to the Chinese in 1998 Perth.

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